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Article: A developmental model for similarities and dissimilarities between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

TitleA developmental model for similarities and dissimilarities between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
Citation
Schizophrenia Research, 2004, v. 71 n. 2-3, p. 405-416 How to Cite?
AbstractSchizophrenia and mania have a number of symptoms and epidemiological characteristics in common, and both respond to dopamine blockade. Family, twin and molecular genetic studies suggest that the reason for these similarities may be that the two conditions share certain susceptibility genes. On the other hand, individuals with schizophrenia have more obvious brain structural and neuropsychological abnormalities than those with bipolar disorder; and pre-schizophrenic children are characterised by cognitive and neuromotor impairments, which are not shared by children who later develop bipolar disorder. Furthermore, the risk-increasing effect of obstetric complications has been demonstrated for schizophrenia but not for bipolar disorder. Perinatal complications such as hypoxia are known to result in smaller volume of the amygdala and hippocampus, which have been frequently reported to be reduced in schizophrenia; familial predisposition to schizophrenia is also associated with decreased volume of these structures. We suggest a model to explain the similarities and differences between the disorders and propose that, on a background of shared genetic predisposition to psychosis, schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder, is subject to additional genes or early insults, which impair neurodevelopment, especially of the medial temporal lobe. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175974
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.304
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Os, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorZanelli, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCannon, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorMcdonald, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:03:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:03:09Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationSchizophrenia Research, 2004, v. 71 n. 2-3, p. 405-416en_US
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175974-
dc.description.abstractSchizophrenia and mania have a number of symptoms and epidemiological characteristics in common, and both respond to dopamine blockade. Family, twin and molecular genetic studies suggest that the reason for these similarities may be that the two conditions share certain susceptibility genes. On the other hand, individuals with schizophrenia have more obvious brain structural and neuropsychological abnormalities than those with bipolar disorder; and pre-schizophrenic children are characterised by cognitive and neuromotor impairments, which are not shared by children who later develop bipolar disorder. Furthermore, the risk-increasing effect of obstetric complications has been demonstrated for schizophrenia but not for bipolar disorder. Perinatal complications such as hypoxia are known to result in smaller volume of the amygdala and hippocampus, which have been frequently reported to be reduced in schizophrenia; familial predisposition to schizophrenia is also associated with decreased volume of these structures. We suggest a model to explain the similarities and differences between the disorders and propose that, on a background of shared genetic predisposition to psychosis, schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder, is subject to additional genes or early insults, which impair neurodevelopment, especially of the medial temporal lobe. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAmygdala - Abnormalities - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - Epidemiology - Physiopathology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders - Diagnosis - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDevelopmental Disabilities - Epidemiology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHippocampus - Abnormalities - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Disorders - Epidemiology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Epidemiology - Genetics - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenic Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTemporal Lobe - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.titleA developmental model for similarities and dissimilarities between schizophrenia and bipolar disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.schres.2004.03.002en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15474912-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4944240955en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4944240955&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume71en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-3en_US
dc.identifier.spage405en_US
dc.identifier.epage416en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224660900021-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Os, J=7102358027en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZanelli, J=9337612400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCannon, M=7202419754en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcDonald, C=8749594800en_US

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