File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Rates of adult schizophrenia following prenatal exposure to the Chinese famine of 1959-1961

TitleRates of adult schizophrenia following prenatal exposure to the Chinese famine of 1959-1961
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://jama.ama-assn.org/index.dtl
Citation
Journal Of The American Medical Association, 2005, v. 294 n. 5, p. 557-562 How to Cite?
AbstractContext: Schizophrenia is a common major mental disorder. Intrauterine nutritional deficiency may increase the risk of schizophrenia. The main evidence comes from studies of the 1944-1945 Dutch Hunger Winter when a sharp and time-limited decline in food intake occurred. The most exposed cohort conceived during the famine showed a 2-fold increased risk of schizophrenia. Objective: To determine whether those who endured a massive 1959-1961 famine in China experienced similar results. Design, Setting, and Participants: The risk of schizophrenia was examined in the Wuhu region of Anhui, one of the most affected provinces. Rates were compared among those born before, during, and after the famine years. Wuhu and its surrounding 6 counties are served by a single psychiatric hospital. All psychiatric case records for the years 1971 through 2001 were examined, and clinical and sociodemographic information on patients with schizophrenia was extracted by researchers who were blinded to the nature of exposure. Data on number of births and deaths in the famine years were available, and cumulative mortality was estimated from later demographic surveys. Main Outcome Measures: Evidence of famine was verified, and unadjusted and mortality-adjusted relative risks of schizophrenia were calculated. Results: The birth rates (per 1000) in Anhui decreased approximately 80% during the famine years from 28.28 in 1958 and 20.97 in 1959 to 8.61 in 1960 and 11.06 in 1961. Among births that occurred during the famine years, the adjusted risk of developing schizophrenia in later life increased significantly, from 0.84% in 1959 to 2.15% in 1960 and 1.81% in 1961. The mortality-adjusted relative risk was 2.30 (95% confidence interval, 1.99-2.65) for those born in 1960 and 1.93 (95% confidence interval, 1.68-2.23) for those born in 1961. Conclusion: Our findings replicate the Dutch data for a separate racial group and show that prenatal exposure to famine increases risk of schizophrenia in later life. ©2005 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175934
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 37.684
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.440
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSt Clair, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorGu, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorHe, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:02:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:02:38Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Medical Association, 2005, v. 294 n. 5, p. 557-562en_US
dc.identifier.issn0098-7484en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175934-
dc.description.abstractContext: Schizophrenia is a common major mental disorder. Intrauterine nutritional deficiency may increase the risk of schizophrenia. The main evidence comes from studies of the 1944-1945 Dutch Hunger Winter when a sharp and time-limited decline in food intake occurred. The most exposed cohort conceived during the famine showed a 2-fold increased risk of schizophrenia. Objective: To determine whether those who endured a massive 1959-1961 famine in China experienced similar results. Design, Setting, and Participants: The risk of schizophrenia was examined in the Wuhu region of Anhui, one of the most affected provinces. Rates were compared among those born before, during, and after the famine years. Wuhu and its surrounding 6 counties are served by a single psychiatric hospital. All psychiatric case records for the years 1971 through 2001 were examined, and clinical and sociodemographic information on patients with schizophrenia was extracted by researchers who were blinded to the nature of exposure. Data on number of births and deaths in the famine years were available, and cumulative mortality was estimated from later demographic surveys. Main Outcome Measures: Evidence of famine was verified, and unadjusted and mortality-adjusted relative risks of schizophrenia were calculated. Results: The birth rates (per 1000) in Anhui decreased approximately 80% during the famine years from 28.28 in 1958 and 20.97 in 1959 to 8.61 in 1960 and 11.06 in 1961. Among births that occurred during the famine years, the adjusted risk of developing schizophrenia in later life increased significantly, from 0.84% in 1959 to 2.15% in 1960 and 1.81% in 1961. The mortality-adjusted relative risk was 2.30 (95% confidence interval, 1.99-2.65) for those born in 1960 and 1.93 (95% confidence interval, 1.68-2.23) for those born in 1961. Conclusion: Our findings replicate the Dutch data for a separate racial group and show that prenatal exposure to famine increases risk of schizophrenia in later life. ©2005 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://jama.ama-assn.org/index.dtlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Associationen_US
dc.titleRates of adult schizophrenia following prenatal exposure to the Chinese famine of 1959-1961en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/jama.294.5.557en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16077049-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-23044493965en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-23044493965&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume294en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage557en_US
dc.identifier.epage562en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000230937500015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSt Clair, D=35354078200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, M=7403607565en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, P=7405461203en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, Y=7406252724en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, Y=8533976500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, F=24465951900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZheng, X=35239271100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, N=7102669732en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFeng, G=7401641914en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, L=36080215400en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats