File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The value of four mental health self-report scales in predicting interview-based mood and anxiety disorder diagnoses in sibling pairs

TitleThe value of four mental health self-report scales in predicting interview-based mood and anxiety disorder diagnoses in sibling pairs
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherAustralian Academic Press Pty Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.australianacademicpress.com.au/Publications/Journals/Twin_R/TResearch.htm
Citation
Twin Research And Human Genetics, 2005, v. 8 n. 2, p. 101-107 How to Cite?
AbstractQuestionnaire-based dimensional measures are often employed in epidemiological studies to predict the presence of psychiatric disorders. The present study sought to determine how accurately 4 dimensional mental health measures, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), Neuroticism (EPQ-N), the high positive affect and anxious arousal scales from the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ-HPA and MASQ-AA) and a composite of all 4, predicted psychiatric caseness as diagnosed by the University of Michigan Composite International Diagnostic Interview (UM-CIDI). Community subjects were recruited through general practitioners; those who agreed to participate were sent a questionnaire containing the above measures. Subsequently, the UM-CIDI was administered by telephone to 469 subjects consisting of sibling pairs who scored most discordantly or concordantly on a composite index of the 4 measures. Logistic Regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were carried out to assess the predictive accuracy of the dimensional measures on UM-CIDI diagnosis. A total of 179 subjects, 62 men and 117 women with an average age of 42 years, were diagnosed with at least one of the following psychiatric disorders: depression, dysthymia, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social phobia, agoraphobia and panic attack. The six disorders showed high comorbidity. EPQ-N and the Composite Index were found to be very strong and accurate predictors of psychiatric caseness; they were however unable to differentiate between specific disorders. The results from the present study therefore validated the four mental health measures as being predictive of psychiatric caseness.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175923
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.339
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.384
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, RJen_US
dc.contributor.authorNeale, BMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSterne, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrince, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:02:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:02:32Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationTwin Research And Human Genetics, 2005, v. 8 n. 2, p. 101-107en_US
dc.identifier.issn1832-4274en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175923-
dc.description.abstractQuestionnaire-based dimensional measures are often employed in epidemiological studies to predict the presence of psychiatric disorders. The present study sought to determine how accurately 4 dimensional mental health measures, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), Neuroticism (EPQ-N), the high positive affect and anxious arousal scales from the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ-HPA and MASQ-AA) and a composite of all 4, predicted psychiatric caseness as diagnosed by the University of Michigan Composite International Diagnostic Interview (UM-CIDI). Community subjects were recruited through general practitioners; those who agreed to participate were sent a questionnaire containing the above measures. Subsequently, the UM-CIDI was administered by telephone to 469 subjects consisting of sibling pairs who scored most discordantly or concordantly on a composite index of the 4 measures. Logistic Regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were carried out to assess the predictive accuracy of the dimensional measures on UM-CIDI diagnosis. A total of 179 subjects, 62 men and 117 women with an average age of 42 years, were diagnosed with at least one of the following psychiatric disorders: depression, dysthymia, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social phobia, agoraphobia and panic attack. The six disorders showed high comorbidity. EPQ-N and the Composite Index were found to be very strong and accurate predictors of psychiatric caseness; they were however unable to differentiate between specific disorders. The results from the present study therefore validated the four mental health measures as being predictive of psychiatric caseness.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Academic Press Pty Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.australianacademicpress.com.au/Publications/Journals/Twin_R/TResearch.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTwin Research and Human Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAffecten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAgoraphobia - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disorders - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshArousalen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshDysthymic Disorder - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshForecastingen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInterview, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMood Disorders - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurotic Disorders - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPanic Disorder - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Inventoryen_US
dc.subject.meshPhobic Disorders - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value Of Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshSiblingsen_US
dc.titleThe value of four mental health self-report scales in predicting interview-based mood and anxiety disorder diagnoses in sibling pairsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1375/1832427053738773en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15901472-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-17844387614en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-17844387614&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage101en_US
dc.identifier.epage107en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229448700003-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliamson, RJ=7401944359en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNeale, BM=7003484514en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSterne, A=6603417496en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPrince, M=23986134300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats