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Article: Relapse prevention in patients with bipolar disorder: Cognitive therapy outcome after 2 years

TitleRelapse prevention in patients with bipolar disorder: Cognitive therapy outcome after 2 years
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherAmerican Psychiatric Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org
Citation
American Journal Of Psychiatry, 2005, v. 162 n. 2, p. 324-329 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: In a previous randomized controlled study, the authors reported significant beneficial effects of cognitive therapy for relapse prevention in bipolar disorder patients up to 1 year. This study reports additional 18-month follow-up data and presents an overview of the effect of therapy over 30 months. Method: Patients with DSM-IV bipolar I disorder (N=103) suffering from frequent relapses were randomly assigned into a cognitive therapy plus medication group or a control condition of medication only. Independent raters, who were blind to patient group status, assessed patients at 6-month intervals. Results: Over 30 months, the cognitive therapy group had significantly better outcome in terms of time to relapse. However, the effect of relapse prevention was mainly in the first year. The cognitive therapy group also spent 110 fewer days (95% CI=32 to 189) in bipolar episodes out of a total of 900 for the whole 30 months and 54 fewer days (95% CI=3 to 105) in bipolar episodes out of a total of 450 for the last 18 months. Multivariate analyses of variance showed that over the last 18 months, the cognitive therapy group exhibited significantly better mood ratings, social functioning, coping with bipolar prodromes, and dysfunctional goal attainment cognition. Conclusions: Patients in the cognitive therapy group had significantly fewer days in bipolar episodes after the effect of medication compliance was controlled. However, the results showed that cognitive therapy had no significant effect in relapse reduction over the last 18 months of the study period. Further studies should explore the effect of booster sessions or maintenance therapy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175903
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 13.505
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.218
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, DHen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayward, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatkins, ERen_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:02:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:02:21Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Psychiatry, 2005, v. 162 n. 2, p. 324-329en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-953Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175903-
dc.description.abstractObjective: In a previous randomized controlled study, the authors reported significant beneficial effects of cognitive therapy for relapse prevention in bipolar disorder patients up to 1 year. This study reports additional 18-month follow-up data and presents an overview of the effect of therapy over 30 months. Method: Patients with DSM-IV bipolar I disorder (N=103) suffering from frequent relapses were randomly assigned into a cognitive therapy plus medication group or a control condition of medication only. Independent raters, who were blind to patient group status, assessed patients at 6-month intervals. Results: Over 30 months, the cognitive therapy group had significantly better outcome in terms of time to relapse. However, the effect of relapse prevention was mainly in the first year. The cognitive therapy group also spent 110 fewer days (95% CI=32 to 189) in bipolar episodes out of a total of 900 for the whole 30 months and 54 fewer days (95% CI=3 to 105) in bipolar episodes out of a total of 450 for the last 18 months. Multivariate analyses of variance showed that over the last 18 months, the cognitive therapy group exhibited significantly better mood ratings, social functioning, coping with bipolar prodromes, and dysfunctional goal attainment cognition. Conclusions: Patients in the cognitive therapy group had significantly fewer days in bipolar episodes after the effect of medication compliance was controlled. However, the results showed that cognitive therapy had no significant effect in relapse reduction over the last 18 months of the study period. Further studies should explore the effect of booster sessions or maintenance therapy.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychiatric Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajp.psychiatryonline.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnticonvulsants - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - Drug Therapy - Prevention & Control - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCognitive Therapy - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Complianceen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen_US
dc.subject.meshRecurrence - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Adjustmenten_US
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleRelapse prevention in patients with bipolar disorder: Cognitive therapy outcome after 2 yearsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ajp.162.2.324en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15677598-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13444271624en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-13444271624&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume162en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage324en_US
dc.identifier.epage329en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227210800019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, DH=7201749639en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHayward, P=7103170498en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWatkins, ER=7005080883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWright, K=9738948500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US

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