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Article: Effect of neuroticism, response style and information processing on depression severity in a clinically depressed sample

TitleEffect of neuroticism, response style and information processing on depression severity in a clinically depressed sample
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2003, v. 33 n. 3, p. 469-479 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. It is postulated that individuals who score high on neuroticism would ruminate when faced with stress. A ruminative response style to depression is associated with faulty attribution and higher dysfunctional beliefs, which in turn is associated with a higher level of depression and hopelessness. Distraction is associated with less severe depression. Evidence supporting these hypotheses mainly comes from a non-clinical population. Hence it is not clear if these theories apply to clinical depression. Method. One hundred and nine out-patients suffering from unipolar major depressive disorder were recruited to test these theories, using model-fitting analysis technique. Results. Certain rumination responses to depression were associated with higher levels of depression and hopelessness, faulty attribution and dysfunctional attitudes when gender and the level of depression were controlled. Principal component analysis of the Rumination Scale yielded four factors: 'symptom-based rumination', 'isolation/introspection', 'self-blame' and 'analyse to understand'. Unlike the other factors, 'analyse to understand' did not correlate with the level of depression. Model fitting analysis, though not reflecting entirely the true model, captures most of the hypothesized relationships between important variables. Neuroticism was associated with stress. Rumination was associated with an increased level of dysfunctional beliefs and faulty attribution, which in turn was associated with increased severity of depression. Distraction, in contrast, was associated with lower levels of negative mood. Conclusion. The results of our study support the importance of teaching depressed patients to manage their depressive symptoms by avoiding rumination about their symptoms and engaging in distracting and pleasurable activities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175885
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheckley, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorRijsdijk, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:02:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:02:10Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2003, v. 33 n. 3, p. 469-479en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175885-
dc.description.abstractBackground. It is postulated that individuals who score high on neuroticism would ruminate when faced with stress. A ruminative response style to depression is associated with faulty attribution and higher dysfunctional beliefs, which in turn is associated with a higher level of depression and hopelessness. Distraction is associated with less severe depression. Evidence supporting these hypotheses mainly comes from a non-clinical population. Hence it is not clear if these theories apply to clinical depression. Method. One hundred and nine out-patients suffering from unipolar major depressive disorder were recruited to test these theories, using model-fitting analysis technique. Results. Certain rumination responses to depression were associated with higher levels of depression and hopelessness, faulty attribution and dysfunctional attitudes when gender and the level of depression were controlled. Principal component analysis of the Rumination Scale yielded four factors: 'symptom-based rumination', 'isolation/introspection', 'self-blame' and 'analyse to understand'. Unlike the other factors, 'analyse to understand' did not correlate with the level of depression. Model fitting analysis, though not reflecting entirely the true model, captures most of the hypothesized relationships between important variables. Neuroticism was associated with stress. Rumination was associated with an increased level of dysfunctional beliefs and faulty attribution, which in turn was associated with increased severity of depression. Distraction, in contrast, was associated with lower levels of negative mood. Conclusion. The results of our study support the importance of teaching depressed patients to manage their depressive symptoms by avoiding rumination about their symptoms and engaging in distracting and pleasurable activities.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAffecten_US
dc.subject.meshAttentionen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder - Physiopathology - Prevention & Control - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLikelihood Functionsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurotic Disorders - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Physiological - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshThinkingen_US
dc.titleEffect of neuroticism, response style and information processing on depression severity in a clinically depressed sampleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291702007304en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12701667-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037390881en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037390881&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume33en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage469en_US
dc.identifier.epage479en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182479200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, D=7201749639en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, N=7403172561en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheckley, S=7005612568en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRijsdijk, F=6701830835en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US

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