File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A randomized controlled study of cognitive therapy for relapse prevention for bipolar affective disorder: Outcome of the first year

TitleA randomized controlled study of cognitive therapy for relapse prevention for bipolar affective disorder: Outcome of the first year
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archgenpsychiatry.com
Citation
Archives Of General Psychiatry, 2003, v. 60 n. 2, p. 145-152 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Despite the use of mood stabilizers, a significant proportion of patients with bipolar affective disorder experience frequent relapses. A pilot study of cognitive therapy (CT) specifically designed to prevent relapses for bipolar affective disorder showed encouraging results when used in conjunction with mood stabilizers. This article reports the outcome of a randomized controlled study of CT to help prevent relapses and promote social functioning. Methods: We randomized 103 patients with bipolar 1 disorder according to the DSM-IV, who experienced frequent relapses despite the prescription of commonly used mood stabilizers, into a CT group or control group. Both the control and CT groups received mood stabilizers and regular psychiatric follow-up. In addition, the CT group received an average of 14 sessions of CT during the first 6 months and 2 booster sessions in the second 6 months. Results: During the 12-month period, the CT group had significantly fewer bipolar episodes, days in a bipolar episode, and number of admissions for this type of episode. The CT group also had significantly higher social functioning. During these 12 months, the CT group showed less mood symptoms on the monthly mood questionnaires. Furthermore, there was significantly less fluctuation in manic symptoms in the CT group. The CT group also coped better with manic prodromes at 12 months. Conclusion: Our findings support the conclusion that CT specifically designed for relapse prevention in bipolar affective disorder is a useful tool in conjunction with mood stabilizers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175883
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 14.48
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, DHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatkins, ERen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayward, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorBright, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorParrDavis, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:02:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:02:09Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of General Psychiatry, 2003, v. 60 n. 2, p. 145-152en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-990Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175883-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Despite the use of mood stabilizers, a significant proportion of patients with bipolar affective disorder experience frequent relapses. A pilot study of cognitive therapy (CT) specifically designed to prevent relapses for bipolar affective disorder showed encouraging results when used in conjunction with mood stabilizers. This article reports the outcome of a randomized controlled study of CT to help prevent relapses and promote social functioning. Methods: We randomized 103 patients with bipolar 1 disorder according to the DSM-IV, who experienced frequent relapses despite the prescription of commonly used mood stabilizers, into a CT group or control group. Both the control and CT groups received mood stabilizers and regular psychiatric follow-up. In addition, the CT group received an average of 14 sessions of CT during the first 6 months and 2 booster sessions in the second 6 months. Results: During the 12-month period, the CT group had significantly fewer bipolar episodes, days in a bipolar episode, and number of admissions for this type of episode. The CT group also had significantly higher social functioning. During these 12 months, the CT group showed less mood symptoms on the monthly mood questionnaires. Furthermore, there was significantly less fluctuation in manic symptoms in the CT group. The CT group also coped better with manic prodromes at 12 months. Conclusion: Our findings support the conclusion that CT specifically designed for relapse prevention in bipolar affective disorder is a useful tool in conjunction with mood stabilizers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archgenpsychiatry.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of General Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - Drug Therapy - Prevention & Control - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshCognitive Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care)en_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Complianceen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Inventoryen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychotropic Drugs - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshRecurrence - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Adjustmenten_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleA randomized controlled study of cognitive therapy for relapse prevention for bipolar affective disorder: Outcome of the first yearen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archpsyc.60.2.145en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12578431-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037317247en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037317247&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume60en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage145en_US
dc.identifier.epage152en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000180873200004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, DH=7201749639en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWatkins, ER=7005080883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHayward, P=7103170498en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBright, J=7101698665en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWright, K=9738948500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKerr, N=11638925900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridParrDavis, G=6503871284en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9742424-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats