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Article: The relationship between predisposing factors, premorbid function and symptom dimensions in psychosis: An integrated approach

TitleThe relationship between predisposing factors, premorbid function and symptom dimensions in psychosis: An integrated approach
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier France, Editions Scientifiques et Medicales. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eurpsy
Citation
European Psychiatry, 2002, v. 17 n. 6, p. 311-320 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Increasing evidence suggests psychosis may be more meaningfully viewed in dimensional terms rather than as discrete categorical states and that specific symptom clusters may be identified. If so, particular risk factors and premorbid factors may predict these symptom clusters. Aims. (i) To explore, using principal component analysis, whether specific factors for psychotic symptoms can be isolated. (ii) To establish the predictors of the different symptom factors using multiple regression techniques. Method. One hundred and eighty-nine inpatients with psychotic illness were recruited and information on family history, premorbid factors and current symptoms obtained from them and their mothers. Results. Seven distinct symptom components were identified. Regression analysis failed to identify any developmental predictors of depression or mania. Delusions/hallucinations were predicted by a family history of schizophrenia and by poor school functioning in spite of normal premorbid IQ (F = 6.5; P < 0.001); negative symptoms by early onset of illness, developmental delay and a family history of psychosis (F = 4.1; P = 0.04). Interestingly disorganisation was predicted by the combination of family history of bipolar disorder and low premorbid IQ (F = 4.9; P = 0.003), and paranoia by obstetric complications (OCs) and poor school functioning (F = 4.2; P = 0.01). Conclusion. Delusions and hallucinations, negative symptoms and paranoia all appeared to have a developmental origin though they were associated with different childhood problems. On the other hand, neither mania nor depression was associated with childhood dysfunction. Our most striking finding was that disorganisation appeared to arise when a familial predisposition to mania was compounded by low premorbid IQ. © 2002 Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175869
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.912
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.540
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuerra, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorMata, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:55Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Psychiatry, 2002, v. 17 n. 6, p. 311-320en_US
dc.identifier.issn0924-9338en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175869-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Increasing evidence suggests psychosis may be more meaningfully viewed in dimensional terms rather than as discrete categorical states and that specific symptom clusters may be identified. If so, particular risk factors and premorbid factors may predict these symptom clusters. Aims. (i) To explore, using principal component analysis, whether specific factors for psychotic symptoms can be isolated. (ii) To establish the predictors of the different symptom factors using multiple regression techniques. Method. One hundred and eighty-nine inpatients with psychotic illness were recruited and information on family history, premorbid factors and current symptoms obtained from them and their mothers. Results. Seven distinct symptom components were identified. Regression analysis failed to identify any developmental predictors of depression or mania. Delusions/hallucinations were predicted by a family history of schizophrenia and by poor school functioning in spite of normal premorbid IQ (F = 6.5; P < 0.001); negative symptoms by early onset of illness, developmental delay and a family history of psychosis (F = 4.1; P = 0.04). Interestingly disorganisation was predicted by the combination of family history of bipolar disorder and low premorbid IQ (F = 4.9; P = 0.003), and paranoia by obstetric complications (OCs) and poor school functioning (F = 4.2; P = 0.01). Conclusion. Delusions and hallucinations, negative symptoms and paranoia all appeared to have a developmental origin though they were associated with different childhood problems. On the other hand, neither mania nor depression was associated with childhood dysfunction. Our most striking finding was that disorganisation appeared to arise when a familial predisposition to mania was compounded by low premorbid IQ. © 2002 Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier France, Editions Scientifiques et Medicales. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eurpsyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshDelusions - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder, Major - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDevelopmental Disabilities - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHallucinations - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaternal Behavior - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshParanoid Disorders - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Disorders - Diagnosis - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders - Etiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Adjustmenten_US
dc.titleThe relationship between predisposing factors, premorbid function and symptom dimensions in psychosis: An integrated approachen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0924-9338(02)00685-5-
dc.identifier.pmid12457741-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036812616en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036812616&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage311en_US
dc.identifier.epage320en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000179686900002-
dc.publisher.placeFranceen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuerra, A=22947097000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFearon, P=7003273960en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, P=36078972900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLewis, S=7404041267en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMata, I=9638989000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, R=35406239400en_US

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