File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: 102T/C polymorphism of serotonin receptor type 2A gene is not associated with schizophrenia in either Chinese or British populations
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
Title102T/C polymorphism of serotonin receptor type 2A gene is not associated with schizophrenia in either Chinese or British populations
 
AuthorsHe, L4
Li, T1
Melville, C2
Liu, S4
Feng, GY5
Gu, NF5
Fox, H2
Shaw, D2
Breen, G2
Liu, X4
Sham, P1
Brown, J2
Collier, D1
St Clair, D2 3
 
Issue Date1999
 
CitationAmerican Journal Of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 1999, v. 88 n. 1, p. 95-98 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1096-8628(19990205)88:1<95::AID-AJMG17>3.0.CO;2-O
 
AbstractSeveral pieces of evidence implicate serotonin receptors in the aetiology of schizophrenia, and recently a number of studies have reported a genetic association between the 102T/C polymorphism of serotonin receptor type 2A gene and schizophrenia. Unfortunately a number of failures to replicate these positive associations in both Caucasian and Chinese populations have also been reported. We have examined the 102T/C polymorphism by PCR amplification and restriction analysis of DNA from: 202 schizophrenics and 202 controls from Shanghai; 112 schizophrenics and 224 parents from Chengdu, Cina; and 253 schizophrenics and 244 controls from the the UK. We find no evidence of association or transmission disequilibrium between the 102T/C polymorphism and schizophrenia in any of the groups we have examined. We conclude that either the original positive reports occurred by chance or any effect must be minimal, and urge caution in interpreting small positive results derived using data from different centres.
 
ISSN0148-7299
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1096-8628(19990205)88:1<95::AID-AJMG17>3.0.CO;2-O
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHe, L
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, T
 
dc.contributor.authorMelville, C
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, S
 
dc.contributor.authorFeng, GY
 
dc.contributor.authorGu, NF
 
dc.contributor.authorFox, H
 
dc.contributor.authorShaw, D
 
dc.contributor.authorBreen, G
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, X
 
dc.contributor.authorSham, P
 
dc.contributor.authorBrown, J
 
dc.contributor.authorCollier, D
 
dc.contributor.authorSt Clair, D
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:29Z
 
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:29Z
 
dc.date.issued1999
 
dc.description.abstractSeveral pieces of evidence implicate serotonin receptors in the aetiology of schizophrenia, and recently a number of studies have reported a genetic association between the 102T/C polymorphism of serotonin receptor type 2A gene and schizophrenia. Unfortunately a number of failures to replicate these positive associations in both Caucasian and Chinese populations have also been reported. We have examined the 102T/C polymorphism by PCR amplification and restriction analysis of DNA from: 202 schizophrenics and 202 controls from Shanghai; 112 schizophrenics and 224 parents from Chengdu, Cina; and 253 schizophrenics and 244 controls from the the UK. We find no evidence of association or transmission disequilibrium between the 102T/C polymorphism and schizophrenia in any of the groups we have examined. We conclude that either the original positive reports occurred by chance or any effect must be minimal, and urge caution in interpreting small positive results derived using data from different centres.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 1999, v. 88 n. 1, p. 95-98 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1096-8628(19990205)88:1<95::AID-AJMG17>3.0.CO;2-O
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1096-8628(19990205)88:1<95::AID-AJMG17>3.0.CO;2-O
 
dc.identifier.epage98
 
dc.identifier.issn0148-7299
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid10050975
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033525172
 
dc.identifier.spage95
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175810
 
dc.identifier.volume88
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshCarrier Proteins - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies
 
dc.subject.meshChina
 
dc.subject.meshGenotype
 
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMembrane Glycoproteins - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshMembrane Transport Proteins
 
dc.subject.meshNerve Tissue Proteins
 
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Genetic
 
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Serotonin - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshSerotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
 
dc.title102T/C polymorphism of serotonin receptor type 2A gene is not associated with schizophrenia in either Chinese or British populations
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>He, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, T</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Melville, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Liu, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Feng, GY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Gu, NF</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fox, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Shaw, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Breen, G</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Liu, X</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sham, P</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Brown, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Collier, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>St Clair, D</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-11-26T09:01:29Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-11-26T09:01:29Z</date.available>
<date.issued>1999</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>American Journal Of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 1999, v. 88 n. 1, p. 95-98</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0148-7299</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/175810</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Several pieces of evidence implicate serotonin receptors in the aetiology of schizophrenia, and recently a number of studies have reported a genetic association between the 102T/C polymorphism of serotonin receptor type 2A gene and schizophrenia. Unfortunately a number of failures to replicate these positive associations in both Caucasian and Chinese populations have also been reported. We have examined the 102T/C polymorphism by PCR amplification and restriction analysis of DNA from: 202 schizophrenics and 202 controls from Shanghai; 112 schizophrenics and 224 parents from Chengdu, Cina; and 253 schizophrenics and 244 controls from the the UK. We find no evidence of association or transmission disequilibrium between the 102T/C polymorphism and schizophrenia in any of the groups we have examined. We conclude that either the original positive reports occurred by chance or any effect must be minimal, and urge caution in interpreting small positive results derived using data from different centres.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<relation.ispartof>American Journal of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics</relation.ispartof>
<subject.mesh>Carrier Proteins - Genetics</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Case-Control Studies</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>China</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Genotype</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Great Britain</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Membrane Glycoproteins - Genetics</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Membrane Transport Proteins</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Nerve Tissue Proteins</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Polymorphism, Genetic</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Receptors, Serotonin - Genetics</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Schizophrenia - Genetics</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins</subject.mesh>
<title>102T/C polymorphism of serotonin receptor type 2A gene is not associated with schizophrenia in either Chinese or British populations</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1002/(SICI)1096-8628(19990205)88:1&lt;95::AID-AJMG17&gt;3.0.CO;2-O</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>10050975</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-0033525172</identifier.scopus>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033525172&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>88</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>1</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>95</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>98</identifier.epage>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. King's College London
  2. University of Aberdeen
  3. University of Aberdeen School of Medicine
  4. Chinese Academy of Sciences
  5. Shanghai Mental Health Center