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Article: Factor analysis of symptoms in schizophrenia: Differences between White and Caribbean patients in Camberwell

TitleFactor analysis of symptoms in schizophrenia: Differences between White and Caribbean patients in Camberwell
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 1999, v. 29 n. 3, p. 607-612 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. The incidence of schizophrenia among African-Caribbeans living in Britain has been frequently reported to be increased. We sought to determine whether the symptom profile in schizophrenic patients from this group differed from that of their White counterparts. Methods. Factor analysis was applied to symptom data obtained by the Present State Examination (PSE) from a group of White (N = 96) and Afro-Caribbean (N = 64) patients who satisfied Research Diagnostic Criteria criteria for broad schizophrenia. We identified six symptom dimensions: mania, depression, first-rank delusions, other delusions, hallucinations and one which comprised both manic and catatonic symptoms. Results. The only difference between the two ethnic groups was seen on the mixed mania-catatonia dimension with the Afro-Caribbean group being over-represented. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Discriminant analysis, however, revealed no significant differences between the groups in any dimension. Conclusions. These results indicate that there are no differences between White and African-Caribbean patients with schizophrenia in terms of the core symptoms of the disorder, however, the African-Caribbean patients may present with more symptoms of a mixed affective nature.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175803
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorTakei, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:25Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 1999, v. 29 n. 3, p. 607-612en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175803-
dc.description.abstractBackground. The incidence of schizophrenia among African-Caribbeans living in Britain has been frequently reported to be increased. We sought to determine whether the symptom profile in schizophrenic patients from this group differed from that of their White counterparts. Methods. Factor analysis was applied to symptom data obtained by the Present State Examination (PSE) from a group of White (N = 96) and Afro-Caribbean (N = 64) patients who satisfied Research Diagnostic Criteria criteria for broad schizophrenia. We identified six symptom dimensions: mania, depression, first-rank delusions, other delusions, hallucinations and one which comprised both manic and catatonic symptoms. Results. The only difference between the two ethnic groups was seen on the mixed mania-catatonia dimension with the Afro-Caribbean group being over-represented. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Discriminant analysis, however, revealed no significant differences between the groups in any dimension. Conclusions. These results indicate that there are no differences between White and African-Caribbean patients with schizophrenia in terms of the core symptoms of the disorder, however, the African-Caribbean patients may present with more symptoms of a mixed affective nature.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshDiscriminant Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFactor Analysis, Statisticalen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Diagnosis - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenic Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshWest Indies - Ethnologyen_US
dc.titleFactor analysis of symptoms in schizophrenia: Differences between White and Caribbean patients in Camberwellen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291799008430en_US
dc.identifier.pmid10405081-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032977588en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032977588&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage607en_US
dc.identifier.epage612en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000080803100009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHutchinson, G=35113301500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTakei, N=7102701392en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHarvey, I=7103367222en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_US

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