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Article: Reconstituted human oral and esophageal mucosa in culture

TitleReconstituted human oral and esophageal mucosa in culture
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sivb.org/pubs_a_index.asp
Citation
In Vitro Cellular And Developmental Biology - Animal, 1998, v. 34 n. 1, p. 46-52 How to Cite?
AbstractWe have successfully established monolayer and organotypic culture techniques for growing human oral and esophageal epithelial cells. Cells in monolayer culture were grown in serum-free medium, modified from techniques previously reported by our group. The organotypic cultures were grown in a defined medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Oral and esophageal cells were maintained in keratinocyte basal medium with pituitary extract and other supplements, and 0.05 mM calcium for 7-9 and 9-11 passages, respectively. Both cell types had similar morphology by phase contrast microscopy. When confluent, the cells were predominantly small, basaloid, and uniform and interspersed with larger, differentiated cells. By immunohistochemistry, both cell types in monolayer were positive to AE1, AE3, and 34BE12 antibodies to keratins of stratified epithelia. Oral epithelial cells in monolayer also were positive to 35BH11, representative of simple epithelial keratins, while esophageal cells were not. The esophageal cells were locally positive to K13, while the oral cells were negative. Both were negative for K19. When comparing monolayer to organotypic cultures and to in vivo specimens, there was a significant difference in the expression of keratins. Using organotypic cultures, AE1, AE3, and 34BE12 were strongly positive in both oral and esophageal cells, similar to in vivo tissues. In contrast to monolayers, both were also focally positive for K19. Esophageal cells were strongly positive for K13, while the oral cells were mildly but uniformly positive. Both were negative for keratins of simple epithelia. These two cell culture techniques offer unique opportunities to study the pathobiology, including carcinogenesis, of stable cell systems from the oral and esophageal epithelia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175788
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.971
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.544
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOda, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSavard, CEen_US
dc.contributor.authorEng, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorSekijima, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaigh, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:18Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationIn Vitro Cellular And Developmental Biology - Animal, 1998, v. 34 n. 1, p. 46-52en_US
dc.identifier.issn1071-2690en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175788-
dc.description.abstractWe have successfully established monolayer and organotypic culture techniques for growing human oral and esophageal epithelial cells. Cells in monolayer culture were grown in serum-free medium, modified from techniques previously reported by our group. The organotypic cultures were grown in a defined medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Oral and esophageal cells were maintained in keratinocyte basal medium with pituitary extract and other supplements, and 0.05 mM calcium for 7-9 and 9-11 passages, respectively. Both cell types had similar morphology by phase contrast microscopy. When confluent, the cells were predominantly small, basaloid, and uniform and interspersed with larger, differentiated cells. By immunohistochemistry, both cell types in monolayer were positive to AE1, AE3, and 34BE12 antibodies to keratins of stratified epithelia. Oral epithelial cells in monolayer also were positive to 35BH11, representative of simple epithelial keratins, while esophageal cells were not. The esophageal cells were locally positive to K13, while the oral cells were negative. Both were negative for K19. When comparing monolayer to organotypic cultures and to in vivo specimens, there was a significant difference in the expression of keratins. Using organotypic cultures, AE1, AE3, and 34BE12 were strongly positive in both oral and esophageal cells, similar to in vivo tissues. In contrast to monolayers, both were also focally positive for K19. Esophageal cells were strongly positive for K13, while the oral cells were mildly but uniformly positive. Both were negative for keratins of simple epithelia. These two cell culture techniques offer unique opportunities to study the pathobiology, including carcinogenesis, of stable cell systems from the oral and esophageal epithelia.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sivb.org/pubs_a_index.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofIn Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultureden_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelial Cells - Cytologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEsophagus - Cytologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMouth Mucosa - Cytologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTumor Cells, Cultureden_US
dc.titleReconstituted human oral and esophageal mucosa in cultureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid9542635-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032445536en_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage46en_US
dc.identifier.epage52en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000071882800013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOda, D=7006186359en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSavard, CE=6701738621en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEng, L=25942882000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSekijima, J=6506103215en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHaigh, G=16416555200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US

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