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Article: Biliary lipid composition after liver transplantation: Effect of allograft function and cyclosporine

TitleBiliary lipid composition after liver transplantation: Effect of allograft function and cyclosporine
Authors
Issue Date1998
Citation
Liver Transplantation And Surgery, 1998, v. 4 n. 4, p. 258-264 How to Cite?
AbstractBiliary lipid composition and bile flow are altered after orthotopic liver transplantation. Cyclosporine may have additional effects on biliary lipid composition and secretion. We studied the effects of liver transplantation, allograft function, and cyclosporine on biliary lipids in humans. Changes in lipid composition and secretion were correlated with serum cyclosporine levels, clinical events, and allograft function. Bile samples were withdrawn via a T-tube at interval time points in 17 patients during the first 3 months posttransplantation. Total and individual bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Biliary lipid profiles were then correlated with clinical events, serum cyclosporine levels, and other clinical laboratory values. Biliary lipid concentrations decreased in 3 patients during periods of graft dysfunction (acute cellular rejection, drug-induced hepatitis, and inferior vena caval thrombosis) and increased with resolution of the graft injury. Serum cyclosporine levels were positively correlated with total bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid concentrations in bile. There was no relationship between the composition of secreted bile acids and serum cyclosporine levels. Bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid secretion were not uncoupled in the presence of cyclosporine. We concluded that (1) a decrease in biliary lipid concentrations may be an indicator of worsened graft function in some allografts; (2) biliary lipid concentrations are correlated with increasing cyclosporine levels; and (3) bile acid composition is unchanged, and uncoupling of secretion of other biliary lipids is not observed in the presence of cyclosporine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175784
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKo, CWen_US
dc.contributor.authorKowdley, KVen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaigh, WGen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:15Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationLiver Transplantation And Surgery, 1998, v. 4 n. 4, p. 258-264en_US
dc.identifier.issn1074-3022en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175784-
dc.description.abstractBiliary lipid composition and bile flow are altered after orthotopic liver transplantation. Cyclosporine may have additional effects on biliary lipid composition and secretion. We studied the effects of liver transplantation, allograft function, and cyclosporine on biliary lipids in humans. Changes in lipid composition and secretion were correlated with serum cyclosporine levels, clinical events, and allograft function. Bile samples were withdrawn via a T-tube at interval time points in 17 patients during the first 3 months posttransplantation. Total and individual bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Biliary lipid profiles were then correlated with clinical events, serum cyclosporine levels, and other clinical laboratory values. Biliary lipid concentrations decreased in 3 patients during periods of graft dysfunction (acute cellular rejection, drug-induced hepatitis, and inferior vena caval thrombosis) and increased with resolution of the graft injury. Serum cyclosporine levels were positively correlated with total bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid concentrations in bile. There was no relationship between the composition of secreted bile acids and serum cyclosporine levels. Bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid secretion were not uncoupled in the presence of cyclosporine. We concluded that (1) a decrease in biliary lipid concentrations may be an indicator of worsened graft function in some allografts; (2) biliary lipid concentrations are correlated with increasing cyclosporine levels; and (3) bile acid composition is unchanged, and uncoupling of secretion of other biliary lipids is not observed in the presence of cyclosporine.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLiver Transplantation and Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshBile - Drug Effects - Metabolism - Secretionen_US
dc.subject.meshBile Acids And Salts - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen_US
dc.subject.meshChromatography, High Pressure Liquiden_US
dc.subject.meshCyclosporine - Blood - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshGraft Rejection - Metabolism - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunosuppressive Agents - Blood - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshLipid Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Transplantation - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Homologousen_US
dc.titleBiliary lipid composition after liver transplantation: Effect of allograft function and cyclosporineen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lt.500040405-
dc.identifier.pmid9649637-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031926947en_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage258en_US
dc.identifier.epage264en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000077184000002-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKo, CW=7202596492en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKowdley, KV=26643305700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHaigh, WG=6603814152en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US

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