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Article: Age-period-cohort analysis of the incidence of schizophrenia in Scotland

TitleAge-period-cohort analysis of the incidence of schizophrenia in Scotland
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 1996, v. 26 n. 5, p. 963-973 How to Cite?
AbstractStudies examining a possible decline in the incidence of schizophrenia over the last two to three decades have paid little attention to the possible role of birth cohort effects. We collected data on a Scottish national sample of all schizophrenic patients, admitted for the first time between 1966 and 1990 (N = 11348; male = 6301). In an Age-Period-Cohort analysis, a full model, incorporating three factors, had a substantially better fit to the data than other models (especially, an Age-Period model), providing clear evidence of the presence of a cohort effect. After adjustment for the effects of age and period, there was a 55% reduction in the rate of schizophrenia in men and a 39% fall in the number of women over the 50-year birth period from 1923 to 1973. The marked decline in the first admission rates observed in Scotland cannot, however, be attributed entirely to this cohort effect. Rather, a greater proportion of the declining first admission rates (88%) is ascribed to the period effect (i.e. artefactual or causally related cross-sectional effects). Nevertheless, the fact that a birth-cohort effect accounts for part of the declining incidence, suggests that causal environmental factors operating early in life have been diminishing in intensity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175744
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTakei, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:54Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 1996, v. 26 n. 5, p. 963-973en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175744-
dc.description.abstractStudies examining a possible decline in the incidence of schizophrenia over the last two to three decades have paid little attention to the possible role of birth cohort effects. We collected data on a Scottish national sample of all schizophrenic patients, admitted for the first time between 1966 and 1990 (N = 11348; male = 6301). In an Age-Period-Cohort analysis, a full model, incorporating three factors, had a substantially better fit to the data than other models (especially, an Age-Period model), providing clear evidence of the presence of a cohort effect. After adjustment for the effects of age and period, there was a 55% reduction in the rate of schizophrenia in men and a 39% fall in the number of women over the 50-year birth period from 1923 to 1973. The marked decline in the first admission rates observed in Scotland cannot, however, be attributed entirely to this cohort effect. Rather, a greater proportion of the declining first admission rates (88%) is ascribed to the period effect (i.e. artefactual or causally related cross-sectional effects). Nevertheless, the fact that a birth-cohort effect accounts for part of the declining incidence, suggests that causal environmental factors operating early in life have been diminishing in intensity.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshCausalityen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Effecten_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_US
dc.subject.meshLikelihood Functionsen_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Admission - Statistics & Numerical Data - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshScotland - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleAge-period-cohort analysis of the incidence of schizophrenia in Scotlanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291700035297-
dc.identifier.pmid8878329-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029811464en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0029811464&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage963en_US
dc.identifier.epage973en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996VH58100008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTakei, N=35874982900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLewis, G=7402636617en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_US

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