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Article: Dietary induction of cholesterol gallstones in the owl monkey: Preliminary findings in a new animal model

TitleDietary induction of cholesterol gallstones in the owl monkey: Preliminary findings in a new animal model
Authors
Issue Date1995
Citation
Laboratory Animal Science, 1995, v. 45 n. 6, p. 657-662 How to Cite?
AbstractThe owl monkey (Aotus nancymae) is a primate with a bile acid and biliary lipid profile resembling that of humans. Aotus spp. are among the rare species, including humans, that spontaneously develop cholesterol gallstones. With dietary induction the owl monkey proved a rapid, reliable model of cholesterol cholelithiasis. Six owl monkeys, three of each sex, were fed a diet supplemented with 1.5% cholesterol for 5 weeks. Each week blood samples were drawn for cholesterol determination, and bile samples were obtained by ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration of the gallbladder. Weekly ultrasound imaging documented development of gallbladder sludge in all animals, with eventual stone formation in five of six. At necropsy after 5 weeks consuming the diet, all animals had distinct sludging and/or small stones in the gallbladder, correlating with the ultrasound findings. Plasma cholesterol values remained lower in females but increased markedly in some males to > 1,400 mg/dl. Histologic examination revealed mild, diffuse hepatocellular lipidosis and degeneration in four of six animals. Detailed examination of the gallbladder indicated that transhepatic needle punctures induced minimal focal abnormalities, judged inconsequential. In contrast to rodent models commonly in use, owl monkeys have liver and digestive tract anatomy and bile physiology that is similar to that in humans. These similarities give this model the potential to substantively improve understanding of the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of human cholesterol gallstones. This model can provide sequential, simultaneous correlation of plasma and biliary lipids, imaging of gallbladder contents, and physiologic processes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175739
ISSN
2001 Impact Factor: 0.564
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPekow, CAen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeller, REen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchulte, SJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:53Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationLaboratory Animal Science, 1995, v. 45 n. 6, p. 657-662en_US
dc.identifier.issn0023-6764en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175739-
dc.description.abstractThe owl monkey (Aotus nancymae) is a primate with a bile acid and biliary lipid profile resembling that of humans. Aotus spp. are among the rare species, including humans, that spontaneously develop cholesterol gallstones. With dietary induction the owl monkey proved a rapid, reliable model of cholesterol cholelithiasis. Six owl monkeys, three of each sex, were fed a diet supplemented with 1.5% cholesterol for 5 weeks. Each week blood samples were drawn for cholesterol determination, and bile samples were obtained by ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration of the gallbladder. Weekly ultrasound imaging documented development of gallbladder sludge in all animals, with eventual stone formation in five of six. At necropsy after 5 weeks consuming the diet, all animals had distinct sludging and/or small stones in the gallbladder, correlating with the ultrasound findings. Plasma cholesterol values remained lower in females but increased markedly in some males to > 1,400 mg/dl. Histologic examination revealed mild, diffuse hepatocellular lipidosis and degeneration in four of six animals. Detailed examination of the gallbladder indicated that transhepatic needle punctures induced minimal focal abnormalities, judged inconsequential. In contrast to rodent models commonly in use, owl monkeys have liver and digestive tract anatomy and bile physiology that is similar to that in humans. These similarities give this model the potential to substantively improve understanding of the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of human cholesterol gallstones. This model can provide sequential, simultaneous correlation of plasma and biliary lipids, imaging of gallbladder contents, and physiologic processes.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLaboratory Animal Scienceen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAotidaeen_US
dc.subject.meshCholelithiasis - Diagnosis - Etiology - Metabolism - Veterinaryen_US
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - Blood - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, Dietary - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGallbladder - Pathology - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.titleDietary induction of cholesterol gallstones in the owl monkey: Preliminary findings in a new animal modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid8746526-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029589734en_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage657en_US
dc.identifier.epage662en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995TL46700007-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPekow, CA=6506433548en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeller, RE=16940612100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchulte, SJ=7006502482en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US

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