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Article: Biliary sludge and acute pancreatitis

TitleBiliary sludge and acute pancreatitis
Authors
Issue Date1994
Citation
Hospital Practice, 1994, v. 29 n. 5, p. 45-52 How to Cite?
AbstractA 76-year-old nursing home resident was referred for evaluation of recurrent abdominal pain. He described it as a severe, dull ache in the central upper abdomen that lasted one to two hours at a time and did not radiate. He said that it was not associated with meals or alleviated by antacids and that nausea, vomiting, and fever were not involved. The patient had no history of similar pain. He had mild non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, which was being treated with glyburide (5 mg daily). He had had a stroke four years ago, which left him with partial left-sided paralysis. On examination, he had no jaundice, pallor, or lymphadenopathy. He was not in pain, and the abdomen was not tender. Signs were normal, except for incomplete hemiparesis. His prostate was mildly enlarged. The stool was guaiac-negative. A complete blood count was normal, as were liver function tests and serum amylase and lipase values. Upper GI endoscopy showed mild reflux esophagitis but no other abnormalities. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a normal liver. The gallbladder, however, contained some low-amplitude echogenic material with no postacoustic shadowing. The material was mobile, gravitating to the most dependent part of the organ when the patient was turned. Intra- and extrahepatic ducts were normal, and the pancreas was unremarkable. Omeprazole was prescribed, 40 mg at bedtime, and the patient was returned to the nursing home.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175701
ISSN
2003 Impact Factor: 0.476
2004 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.165
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreenberger, NJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:35Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationHospital Practice, 1994, v. 29 n. 5, p. 45-52en_US
dc.identifier.issn8750-2836en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175701-
dc.description.abstractA 76-year-old nursing home resident was referred for evaluation of recurrent abdominal pain. He described it as a severe, dull ache in the central upper abdomen that lasted one to two hours at a time and did not radiate. He said that it was not associated with meals or alleviated by antacids and that nausea, vomiting, and fever were not involved. The patient had no history of similar pain. He had mild non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, which was being treated with glyburide (5 mg daily). He had had a stroke four years ago, which left him with partial left-sided paralysis. On examination, he had no jaundice, pallor, or lymphadenopathy. He was not in pain, and the abdomen was not tender. Signs were normal, except for incomplete hemiparesis. His prostate was mildly enlarged. The stool was guaiac-negative. A complete blood count was normal, as were liver function tests and serum amylase and lipase values. Upper GI endoscopy showed mild reflux esophagitis but no other abnormalities. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a normal liver. The gallbladder, however, contained some low-amplitude echogenic material with no postacoustic shadowing. The material was mobile, gravitating to the most dependent part of the organ when the patient was turned. Intra- and extrahepatic ducts were normal, and the pancreas was unremarkable. Omeprazole was prescribed, 40 mg at bedtime, and the patient was returned to the nursing home.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHospital Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAlgorithmsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiliary Tract Diseases - Diagnosis - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholelithiasis - Complications - Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshColic - Diagnosis - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differentialen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPancreatitis - Diagnosis - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRecurrenceen_US
dc.titleBiliary sludge and acute pancreatitisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid8175937-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028216784en_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage45en_US
dc.identifier.epage52en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994NL04600009-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGreenberger, NJ=7007052727en_US

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