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Article: Gallbladder mucosal function: Studies in absorption and secretion in humans and in dog gallbladder epithelium

TitleGallbladder mucosal function: Studies in absorption and secretion in humans and in dog gallbladder epithelium
Authors
Issue Date1992
PublisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajpcon.physiology.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Physiology - Gastrointestinal And Liver Physiology, 1992, v. 263 n. 1 26-1, p. G69-G74 How to Cite?
AbstractThe gallbladder is conventionally regarded as an absorptive organ such that dilute hepatic bile is both stored and concentrated. We studied 35 patients who had recovered from a percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage performed for acute cholecystitis. After an overnight fast, gallbladder bile was dark brown in color and had a wide scatter in the lipid composition. Two hours after a meal, the gallbladder bile was opalescent white in color and had the composition of an extracellular fluid. This phenomenon was uniformly observed in all 35 patients and was also consistently reproducible when five patients were repeatedly studied. We used normal dog gallbladder epithelial cell monolayers grown in culture and examined sodium flux. Control gallbladder cells absorbed sodium. When secretin (0.5-2.5 x 10 -7 M) was added, there was a prompt reversal of sodium flux, resulting in net secretion. We conclude that secretion is a physiological function of the gallbladder mucosa. After feeding, the neural and humoral factors divert stored and newly secreted bile into the duodenum and induce active de novo secretion thus producing a gallbladder bile that is opalescent white with no lipids. Our results also have important implications on the origin of the pathological 'white bile,' the pathogenesis and treatment of gallbladder sludge, as well as the kinetic analysis of compounds undergoing enterohepatic recirculation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175675
ISSN
1998 Impact Factor: 3.077
2004 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.102
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIgimi, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorYamamoto, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:25Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Physiology - Gastrointestinal And Liver Physiology, 1992, v. 263 n. 1 26-1, p. G69-G74en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9513en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175675-
dc.description.abstractThe gallbladder is conventionally regarded as an absorptive organ such that dilute hepatic bile is both stored and concentrated. We studied 35 patients who had recovered from a percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage performed for acute cholecystitis. After an overnight fast, gallbladder bile was dark brown in color and had a wide scatter in the lipid composition. Two hours after a meal, the gallbladder bile was opalescent white in color and had the composition of an extracellular fluid. This phenomenon was uniformly observed in all 35 patients and was also consistently reproducible when five patients were repeatedly studied. We used normal dog gallbladder epithelial cell monolayers grown in culture and examined sodium flux. Control gallbladder cells absorbed sodium. When secretin (0.5-2.5 x 10 -7 M) was added, there was a prompt reversal of sodium flux, resulting in net secretion. We conclude that secretion is a physiological function of the gallbladder mucosa. After feeding, the neural and humoral factors divert stored and newly secreted bile into the duodenum and induce active de novo secretion thus producing a gallbladder bile that is opalescent white with no lipids. Our results also have important implications on the origin of the pathological 'white bile,' the pathogenesis and treatment of gallbladder sludge, as well as the kinetic analysis of compounds undergoing enterohepatic recirculation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajpcon.physiology.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAbsorptionen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBile - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Transport - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshCholecystokinin - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCircadian Rhythmen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelium - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshFastingen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGallbladder - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMucous Membrane - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSecretin - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSodium - Pharmacokineticsen_US
dc.titleGallbladder mucosal function: Studies in absorption and secretion in humans and in dog gallbladder epitheliumen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1636718-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026642449en_US
dc.identifier.volume263en_US
dc.identifier.issue1 26-1en_US
dc.identifier.spageG69en_US
dc.identifier.epageG74en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992JF31900067-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIgimi, H=35353540300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYamamoto, F=7202613144en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US

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