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Article: Pathophysiology of gallstone formation

TitlePathophysiology of gallstone formation
Authors
Issue Date1990
PublisherExcerpta Medica, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/clinthera
Citation
Clinical Therapeutics, 1990, v. 12 n. 3, p. 194-199 How to Cite?
AbstractResearch on gallstone formation has been focused on the role of supersaturated bile in cholesterol gallstone disease. But now investigators have advanced the concept of nucleation, which holds that the interaction of pronucleators and antinucleators is responsible for the formation of cholesterol crystals and the subsequent development of gallstones. Ultrasonography can identify biliary sludge, the chemical composition of which appears to depend on the type of medical disorder present. The chemical composition of sludge will determine the composition of the gallstones - either cholesterol stones or pigment stones - that eventually form. Nonsurgical interventions, such as bile acids, are effective in the treatment of cholesterol gallstones, which account for approximately gallstones, which account for approximately 80% of cases that develop in Western populations. Bile acids are not effective in treating calcium bilirubinate stones.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175655
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.925
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.997
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:18Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Therapeutics, 1990, v. 12 n. 3, p. 194-199en_US
dc.identifier.issn0149-2918en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175655-
dc.description.abstractResearch on gallstone formation has been focused on the role of supersaturated bile in cholesterol gallstone disease. But now investigators have advanced the concept of nucleation, which holds that the interaction of pronucleators and antinucleators is responsible for the formation of cholesterol crystals and the subsequent development of gallstones. Ultrasonography can identify biliary sludge, the chemical composition of which appears to depend on the type of medical disorder present. The chemical composition of sludge will determine the composition of the gallstones - either cholesterol stones or pigment stones - that eventually form. Nonsurgical interventions, such as bile acids, are effective in the treatment of cholesterol gallstones, which account for approximately gallstones, which account for approximately 80% of cases that develop in Western populations. Bile acids are not effective in treating calcium bilirubinate stones.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherExcerpta Medica, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/clintheraen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Therapeuticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBilirubin - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCalcium - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholelithiasis - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.titlePathophysiology of gallstone formationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2199058-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025287469en_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage194en_US
dc.identifier.epage199en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990DL95500001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US

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