File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Partial characterization of a nonmicellar system of cholesterol solubilization in bile

TitlePartial characterization of a nonmicellar system of cholesterol solubilization in bile
Authors
Issue Date1987
PublisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://intl-ajpgi.physiology.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Physiology - Gastrointestinal And Liver Physiology, 1987, v. 252 n. 3, p. 15/3 How to Cite?
AbstractWe have shown that there were two distinctly separate cholesterol-containing fractions in human hepatic and gallbladder bile. In addition to mixed micelles that were composed of bile salts, cholesterol, and phospholipids and measured at ~25 Å by quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy, there was a nonmicellar fraction made up of cholesterol and phospholipids with no, or only trace amount of bile salts. This fraction had a mean hydrodynamic radius of 600 Å. When studied with electron microscopy, the fraction consisted of particles spherical in shape that measured 900-1,300 Å in diameter and were monodisperse. This form of cholesterol had a low buoyant density of <1.05 g/ml by density gradient ultracentrifugation and eluted as a macromolecular aggregate (mol wt>200,000) employing Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The quantity of nonmicellar cholesterol in bile correlated positively with the cholesterol saturation index (r=0.649; P<0.001) and inversely with relative bile salt concentration (r=-0.572, P≤0.03) and total lipid concentration (r=-0.844, P<0.0001). In vitro and in vivo addition of bile salts resulted in a shift of nonmicellar cholesterol to micellar cholesterol. In hepatic bile, nonmicellar cholesterol was the predominant and sometimes the exclusive form of cholesterol transport. When nucleation experiments were performed on gallbladder bile samples, the cholesterol that had nucleated were almost exclusively derived from the nonmicellar fraction.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175646
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.297
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.936
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, HZen_US
dc.contributor.authorMadani, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaler, EWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:15Z-
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Physiology - Gastrointestinal And Liver Physiology, 1987, v. 252 n. 3, p. 15/3en_US
dc.identifier.issn0193-1857en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175646-
dc.description.abstractWe have shown that there were two distinctly separate cholesterol-containing fractions in human hepatic and gallbladder bile. In addition to mixed micelles that were composed of bile salts, cholesterol, and phospholipids and measured at ~25 Å by quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy, there was a nonmicellar fraction made up of cholesterol and phospholipids with no, or only trace amount of bile salts. This fraction had a mean hydrodynamic radius of 600 Å. When studied with electron microscopy, the fraction consisted of particles spherical in shape that measured 900-1,300 Å in diameter and were monodisperse. This form of cholesterol had a low buoyant density of <1.05 g/ml by density gradient ultracentrifugation and eluted as a macromolecular aggregate (mol wt>200,000) employing Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The quantity of nonmicellar cholesterol in bile correlated positively with the cholesterol saturation index (r=0.649; P<0.001) and inversely with relative bile salt concentration (r=-0.572, P≤0.03) and total lipid concentration (r=-0.844, P<0.0001). In vitro and in vivo addition of bile salts resulted in a shift of nonmicellar cholesterol to micellar cholesterol. In hepatic bile, nonmicellar cholesterol was the predominant and sometimes the exclusive form of cholesterol transport. When nucleation experiments were performed on gallbladder bile samples, the cholesterol that had nucleated were almost exclusively derived from the nonmicellar fraction.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://intl-ajpgi.physiology.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBileen_US
dc.subject.meshBile Acids And Saltsen_US
dc.subject.meshCentrifugation, Density Gradienten_US
dc.subject.meshChemistry, Physicalen_US
dc.subject.meshCholesterolen_US
dc.subject.meshEatingen_US
dc.subject.meshFastingen_US
dc.subject.meshMicellesen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electronen_US
dc.subject.meshPhospholipidsen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysicochemical Phenomenaen_US
dc.subject.meshSolubilityen_US
dc.titlePartial characterization of a nonmicellar system of cholesterol solubilization in bileen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid3826377-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0023225395en_US
dc.identifier.volume252en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage15/3en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1987G536400052-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPark, HZ=7601570519en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMadani, H=6701613342en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKaler, EW=7007157989en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats