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Article: Pig gastric mucus: A one-way barrier for H+

TitlePig gastric mucus: A one-way barrier for H+
Authors
Issue Date1985
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
Gastroenterology, 1985, v. 89 n. 6, p. 1313-1318 How to Cite?
AbstractGastric mucus is thought to protect the underlying mucosal cells from mechanical hazards and back-diffusion of luminal H+. In health, a pH gradient exists across the mucus layer from the variable low pH of the lumen to a pH approaching neutrality at the epithelial cell surface. By current hypotheses this gradient is maintained by the combined effects of an unstirred layer, restricted or slowed diffusion of H+ in the mucus, and the epithelial cell secretion of bicarbonate, which is confined to the cell surface by the mucus layer. These mechanisms do not explain how H+ is secreted through mucus in the first place. Using a modified diffusion chamber we have shown that pig gastric mucus facilitates a low-efficiency Na+/H+ exchange - a property that helps to clarify some previously unexplained components of H+ secretion. When a solution containing Na+ was separated by a layer of fresh pig gastric mucus from a solution of similar pH containing a much lower concentration of sodium, the sodium-rich solution was electrically negative relative to the sodium-poor solution and its pH decreased significantly with time. A similar pH gradient developed when the barrier was a synthetic cation-exchange membrane, and one of opposite sign when it was an anion exchanger; no pH gradient developed across neutral barriers. It is suggested that similar electrical coupling of H+ diffusion to active Na+ transport might in vivo ensure that secreted H+ moves into the gastric lumen.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175638
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTasmanJones, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorWiggins, PMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:13Z-
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterology, 1985, v. 89 n. 6, p. 1313-1318en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175638-
dc.description.abstractGastric mucus is thought to protect the underlying mucosal cells from mechanical hazards and back-diffusion of luminal H+. In health, a pH gradient exists across the mucus layer from the variable low pH of the lumen to a pH approaching neutrality at the epithelial cell surface. By current hypotheses this gradient is maintained by the combined effects of an unstirred layer, restricted or slowed diffusion of H+ in the mucus, and the epithelial cell secretion of bicarbonate, which is confined to the cell surface by the mucus layer. These mechanisms do not explain how H+ is secreted through mucus in the first place. Using a modified diffusion chamber we have shown that pig gastric mucus facilitates a low-efficiency Na+/H+ exchange - a property that helps to clarify some previously unexplained components of H+ secretion. When a solution containing Na+ was separated by a layer of fresh pig gastric mucus from a solution of similar pH containing a much lower concentration of sodium, the sodium-rich solution was electrically negative relative to the sodium-poor solution and its pH decreased significantly with time. A similar pH gradient developed when the barrier was a synthetic cation-exchange membrane, and one of opposite sign when it was an anion exchanger; no pH gradient developed across neutral barriers. It is suggested that similar electrical coupling of H+ diffusion to active Na+ transport might in vivo ensure that secreted H+ moves into the gastric lumen.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Transport, Activeen_US
dc.subject.meshDialysisen_US
dc.subject.meshDiffusionen_US
dc.subject.meshGastric Mucosa - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrogen-Ion Concentrationen_US
dc.subject.meshMembrane Potentialsen_US
dc.subject.meshMembranes, Artificialen_US
dc.subject.meshMucus - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProtonsen_US
dc.subject.meshSodium - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSwineen_US
dc.titlePig gastric mucus: A one-way barrier for H+en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2996964-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0022412832en_US
dc.identifier.volume89en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1313en_US
dc.identifier.epage1318en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1985AVB1700014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, GW=7406739744en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTasmanJones, C=7003303326en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWiggins, PM=7006787396en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US

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