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Article: Engineering geology in underground aggregate mining and space utilisation

TitleEngineering geology in underground aggregate mining and space utilisation
Authors
Issue Date1993
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enggeo
Citation
Engineering Geology, 1993, v. 35 n. 3-4, p. 247-257 How to Cite?
AbstractAs consumption of construction aggregates increased in the Toronto (Canada) area and as regular source areas faced constraints, attention was given to the possibility of underground mining of limestone aggregate. Following a study of transportation costs and the drilling of several, continuously cored drill holes through the Paleozoic strata, Ontario Hydro and three Ontario government ministries undertook a feasibility study of the mining of limestone aggregate in the Toronto area. The geological study showed the suitability of the Ordovician Gull River Formation as a source rock for the aggregate and the structural conditions suitable for mining operations. A mining operation to produce 3-5 million tonnes/year over 16-30 years was investigated. This involved a decline or a shaft (depending on location) down to a mechanized room and pillar operation (square or rectangular grid) at depths between 200-500 m. Pillar stresses were calculated at less than 40 Mpa - well below the 100 Mpa unconfined compressive strength of the limestone. Operations would be mostly in dry conditions because of the presence of high horizontal stresses. © 1993.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175562
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.196
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.810

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, CFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, OLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:59:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:59:42Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationEngineering Geology, 1993, v. 35 n. 3-4, p. 247-257en_US
dc.identifier.issn0013-7952en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175562-
dc.description.abstractAs consumption of construction aggregates increased in the Toronto (Canada) area and as regular source areas faced constraints, attention was given to the possibility of underground mining of limestone aggregate. Following a study of transportation costs and the drilling of several, continuously cored drill holes through the Paleozoic strata, Ontario Hydro and three Ontario government ministries undertook a feasibility study of the mining of limestone aggregate in the Toronto area. The geological study showed the suitability of the Ordovician Gull River Formation as a source rock for the aggregate and the structural conditions suitable for mining operations. A mining operation to produce 3-5 million tonnes/year over 16-30 years was investigated. This involved a decline or a shaft (depending on location) down to a mechanized room and pillar operation (square or rectangular grid) at depths between 200-500 m. Pillar stresses were calculated at less than 40 Mpa - well below the 100 Mpa unconfined compressive strength of the limestone. Operations would be mostly in dry conditions because of the presence of high horizontal stresses. © 1993.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enggeoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEngineering Geologyen_US
dc.titleEngineering geology in underground aggregate mining and space utilisationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, CF: leecf@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, CF=rp00139en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027789735en_US
dc.identifier.volume35en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage247en_US
dc.identifier.epage257en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, CF=8068602600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhite, OL=7006065790en_US

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