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Article: Sars, preschool routines and children's behaviour: Observations from preschools in Hong Kong

TitleSars, preschool routines and children's behaviour: Observations from preschools in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsEarly Childhood Education
Preschools
Sars
Issue Date2006
PublisherWorld Organization for Early Childhood Education.
Citation
International Journal Of Early Childhood, 2006, v. 38 n. 2, p. 11-22 How to Cite?
AbstractAll schools in Hong Kong were closed in April 2003 to prevent the spread of SARS. This paper considers the influence of the SARS epidemic on children's routines and behaviour when preschools re-opened, after a sixweek closure. Observations were made in 20 kindergartens and principals of another 10 kindergartens completed questionnaires. The influence of SARS was evident in all preschools, be it through teachers and students wearing masks, notices on hand washing or the provision of alcohol dispensers for hand disinfection. The outbreak impacted noticeably upon children's routines and social exchanges. In all schools, physical contact among children and sharing of food were not allowed. Children were also prohibited from talking to their peers when they had removed their masks. The SARS outbreak provided us a "natural experiment" to consider the influence of epidemics on preschools.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175493
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.407
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRao, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:57Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Early Childhood, 2006, v. 38 n. 2, p. 11-22en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7187en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175493-
dc.description.abstractAll schools in Hong Kong were closed in April 2003 to prevent the spread of SARS. This paper considers the influence of the SARS epidemic on children's routines and behaviour when preschools re-opened, after a sixweek closure. Observations were made in 20 kindergartens and principals of another 10 kindergartens completed questionnaires. The influence of SARS was evident in all preschools, be it through teachers and students wearing masks, notices on hand washing or the provision of alcohol dispensers for hand disinfection. The outbreak impacted noticeably upon children's routines and social exchanges. In all schools, physical contact among children and sharing of food were not allowed. Children were also prohibited from talking to their peers when they had removed their masks. The SARS outbreak provided us a "natural experiment" to consider the influence of epidemics on preschools.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWorld Organization for Early Childhood Education.-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Early Childhooden_US
dc.subjectEarly Childhood Educationen_US
dc.subjectPreschoolsen_US
dc.subjectSarsen_US
dc.titleSars, preschool routines and children's behaviour: Observations from preschools in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailRao, N: nrao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityRao, N=rp00953en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF03168205en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79951936933en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros128526-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79951936933&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage11en_US
dc.identifier.epage22en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRao, N=7401628868en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 140625-

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