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Article: Incremental validity of thinking styles in predicting academic achievements: An experimental study in hypermedia learning environments

TitleIncremental validity of thinking styles in predicting academic achievements: An experimental study in hypermedia learning environments
Authors
KeywordsAcademic Achievement
Hypermedia-Based Learning
Thinking Style
Issue Date2010
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01443410.asp
Citation
Educational Psychology, 2010, v. 30 n. 5, p. 605-623 How to Cite?
AbstractThe study examined the incremental validity of thinking styles in predicting academic achievement after controlling for personality and achievement motivation in the hypermedia-based learning environment. Seventy-two Chinese college students from Shanghai, the People's Republic of China, took part in this instructional experiment. The End-Of-Semester test was designed to examine the students' achievement in the course of General Psychology. The results partially supported the hypotheses concerning the relationships between students' Type I and II thinking styles and their academic achievement in Type I test (including analysis, problem-solving, and essay tests) and Type II test (including multiple-choice and cloze tests), and showed that some Type III styles were significantly related to their academic achievement. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the capacity of thinking styles for explaining and predicting academic achievement was sometimes over and above the sum of personality traits and achievement motivation. Implications for educational practice are discussed. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175480
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.157
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.750
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFan, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, LFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatkins, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:55Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationEducational Psychology, 2010, v. 30 n. 5, p. 605-623en_US
dc.identifier.issn0144-3410en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175480-
dc.description.abstractThe study examined the incremental validity of thinking styles in predicting academic achievement after controlling for personality and achievement motivation in the hypermedia-based learning environment. Seventy-two Chinese college students from Shanghai, the People's Republic of China, took part in this instructional experiment. The End-Of-Semester test was designed to examine the students' achievement in the course of General Psychology. The results partially supported the hypotheses concerning the relationships between students' Type I and II thinking styles and their academic achievement in Type I test (including analysis, problem-solving, and essay tests) and Type II test (including multiple-choice and cloze tests), and showed that some Type III styles were significantly related to their academic achievement. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the capacity of thinking styles for explaining and predicting academic achievement was sometimes over and above the sum of personality traits and achievement motivation. Implications for educational practice are discussed. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01443410.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEducational Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectAcademic Achievementen_US
dc.subjectHypermedia-Based Learningen_US
dc.subjectThinking Styleen_US
dc.titleIncremental validity of thinking styles in predicting academic achievements: An experimental study in hypermedia learning environmentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, LF: lfzhang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, LF=rp00988en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01443410.2010.496899en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954639395en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954639395&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage605en_US
dc.identifier.epage623en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279990600007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, W=16052146300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, LF=15039838600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWatkins, D=7203077839en_US

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