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Article: Review on vocational predictors: A systematic review of predictors of vocational outcomes among individuals with schizophrenia: An update since 1998

TitleReview on vocational predictors: A systematic review of predictors of vocational outcomes among individuals with schizophrenia: An update since 1998
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anp
Citation
Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Psychiatry, 2010, v. 44 n. 6, p. 495-504 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Predictors of employment outcomes of individuals with schizophrenia have continued to be studied over the past decade with implications for the development of vocational interventions to help the mentally ill get and keep jobs. Methods: A total of 62 relevant studies since 1998 were systematically reviewed by means of meta-analysis and frequency counts. Frequency count allowed all 62 studies to be included, whereas the meta-analysis excluded studies with inadequate information but made it possible to estimate the magnitude of effects. Results: Both methods resulted in similar findings. In contrast to an earlier review, cognitive functioning received overwhelming support as a significant predictor. Other significant predictors included education, negative symptoms, social support and skills, age, work history (previous history of successful employment), and rehabilitation service to restore community functioning and well-being by occupational therapists, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and other mental health professionals. Positive symptoms, substance abuse, gender and hospitalization history were found to be non-significant predictors. The frequency count did not support marital status as a significant predictor but the meta-analysis did. Conclusions: This review highlights increasing sophistication in understanding the links between individual characteristics and functional impairments. It also suggests that more research is needed into other potentially important predictors that may be changeable and relate to recovery. These include attitudes and beliefs about disability payments and psychological processes such as self-stigmatization, negative beliefs, and social skills deficits for which intervention may be possible. © 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175478
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.536
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.269
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, HWHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, RCKen_US
dc.contributor.authorBell, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, WMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:53Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationAustralian And New Zealand Journal Of Psychiatry, 2010, v. 44 n. 6, p. 495-504en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175478-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Predictors of employment outcomes of individuals with schizophrenia have continued to be studied over the past decade with implications for the development of vocational interventions to help the mentally ill get and keep jobs. Methods: A total of 62 relevant studies since 1998 were systematically reviewed by means of meta-analysis and frequency counts. Frequency count allowed all 62 studies to be included, whereas the meta-analysis excluded studies with inadequate information but made it possible to estimate the magnitude of effects. Results: Both methods resulted in similar findings. In contrast to an earlier review, cognitive functioning received overwhelming support as a significant predictor. Other significant predictors included education, negative symptoms, social support and skills, age, work history (previous history of successful employment), and rehabilitation service to restore community functioning and well-being by occupational therapists, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and other mental health professionals. Positive symptoms, substance abuse, gender and hospitalization history were found to be non-significant predictors. The frequency count did not support marital status as a significant predictor but the meta-analysis did. Conclusions: This review highlights increasing sophistication in understanding the links between individual characteristics and functional impairments. It also suggests that more research is needed into other potentially important predictors that may be changeable and relate to recovery. These include attitudes and beliefs about disability payments and psychological processes such as self-stigmatization, negative beliefs, and social skills deficits for which intervention may be possible. © 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anpen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders - Psychology - Rehabilitationen_US
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMarital Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshOutcome And Process Assessment (Health Care)en_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Care Teamen_US
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen_US
dc.subject.meshRehabilitation, Vocational - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Rehabilitationen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenic Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Adjustmenten_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.titleReview on vocational predictors: A systematic review of predictors of vocational outcomes among individuals with schizophrenia: An update since 1998en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, WM: cwming@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, WM=rp00896en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/00048671003785716en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20482409-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77952834107en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros180957-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77952834107&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume44en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage495en_US
dc.identifier.epage504en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, HWH=7006768493en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, AY=24483345700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, RCK=35794917400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBell, M=35519035000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, WM=22984269400en_US

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