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Article: Recovery of naming and discourse production: a bilingual anomic case study

TitleRecovery of naming and discourse production: a bilingual anomic case study
Authors
KeywordsAdaptation
Anomia
Bilingual aphasia
Brain infarction
Chronic disease
Issue Date2012
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.asp
Citation
Aphasiology, 2012, v. 26 n. 6, p. 737-756 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Differential language recovery in bilingual speakers with aphasia is of interest for theoretical reasons. One issue concerns the interaction between languages (L1-L2), word class (noun versus verb), and language task (naming versus discourse production in recovery). No study has examined this issue in Chinese speakers with aphasia who speak two dialects such as Cantonese and Mandarin that have different phonological and syntactic properties.Aims: We compared the patterns of confrontation naming and discourse production in YF, a Cantonese-Mandarin speaker with a chronic mild anomic aphasia after stroke. Our prediction was that there would be an interaction between the language, word class, and language task.Methods & Procedures: Naming was examined in Cantonese (L1) and Mandarin (L2) with an adaptation of the Object and Action Naming Battery (Druks & Masterson, 2000). Discourse production in L1 and L2 was analysed with the Quantitative Production Analysis (Berndt, Wayland, Rochon, Saffran, & Schwartz, 2000) and Conversation Analysis Profile for People with Aphasia (Whitworth, Perkins, & Lesser, 1997).Outcomes & Results: There were no significant differences in object and action naming or in discourse production between dialects. However there was an effect of word class on naming in L2, with object naming better than action naming in Mandarin, but not in Cantonese (L1).Conclusions: Word class had an effect on recovery in YF's less-dominant language as in other cases of bilingual aphasia. The interaction between word class and language status in a Cantonese-Mandarin speaker suggests that this pattern of recovery is robust across languages. © 2012 Copyright 2012 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa business.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175327
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.139
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.730
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDai, EYLen_US
dc.contributor.authorKong, APHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, BSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationAphasiology, 2012, v. 26 n. 6, p. 737-756en_US
dc.identifier.issn0268-7038en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175327-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Differential language recovery in bilingual speakers with aphasia is of interest for theoretical reasons. One issue concerns the interaction between languages (L1-L2), word class (noun versus verb), and language task (naming versus discourse production in recovery). No study has examined this issue in Chinese speakers with aphasia who speak two dialects such as Cantonese and Mandarin that have different phonological and syntactic properties.Aims: We compared the patterns of confrontation naming and discourse production in YF, a Cantonese-Mandarin speaker with a chronic mild anomic aphasia after stroke. Our prediction was that there would be an interaction between the language, word class, and language task.Methods & Procedures: Naming was examined in Cantonese (L1) and Mandarin (L2) with an adaptation of the Object and Action Naming Battery (Druks & Masterson, 2000). Discourse production in L1 and L2 was analysed with the Quantitative Production Analysis (Berndt, Wayland, Rochon, Saffran, & Schwartz, 2000) and Conversation Analysis Profile for People with Aphasia (Whitworth, Perkins, & Lesser, 1997).Outcomes & Results: There were no significant differences in object and action naming or in discourse production between dialects. However there was an effect of word class on naming in L2, with object naming better than action naming in Mandarin, but not in Cantonese (L1).Conclusions: Word class had an effect on recovery in YF's less-dominant language as in other cases of bilingual aphasia. The interaction between word class and language status in a Cantonese-Mandarin speaker suggests that this pattern of recovery is robust across languages. © 2012 Copyright 2012 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa business.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAphasiologyen_US
dc.rightsAphasiology. Copyright © Psychology Press.-
dc.subjectAdaptationen_US
dc.subjectAnomiaen_US
dc.subjectBilingual aphasiaen_US
dc.subjectBrain infarctionen_US
dc.subjectChronic disease-
dc.titleRecovery of naming and discourse production: a bilingual anomic case studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKong, APH: antkong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWeekes, BS: weekes@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWeekes, BS=rp01390en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02687038.2011.645013en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861855215en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros200412-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861855215&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage737en_US
dc.identifier.epage756en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000304530100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeekes, BS=6701924212en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKong, APH=55241333200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDai, EYL=55242404400en_US

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