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Article: Dissociative neural correlates of semantic processing of nouns and verbs in Chinese - A language with minimal inflectional morphology

TitleDissociative neural correlates of semantic processing of nouns and verbs in Chinese - A language with minimal inflectional morphology
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
Neuroimage, 2011, v. 58 n. 3, p. 912-922 How to Cite?
AbstractNumerous studies using various techniques and methodologies have demonstrated distinctive responses to nouns and verbs both at the behavioral and neurological levels. However, since the great majority of these studies involved tasks employing pictorial stimuli and languages with rich inflectional morphology, it is not clear whether word class effects resulted from semantic differences between objects and actions or different inflectional operations associated with the two word classes. Such shortcomings were addressed in this study by using a language with impoverished inflectional morphology - Chinese. Both concrete and abstract words were included, while controlling for nuisance variables between the two word classes, including imageability, word frequency, age-of-acquisition, and number of stroke. Participants were asked to judge the semantic relatedness of noun or verb pairs by pressing different buttons. The results revealed specific neural correlates for verb class in left lateral temporal and inferior frontal regions. Furthermore, the patterns of neural distribution of nouns and verbs were consistent with observations from Indo-European languages. Plausible accounts for neural separation of word classes were considered. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175316
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorHan, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorBi, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationNeuroimage, 2011, v. 58 n. 3, p. 912-922en_US
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175316-
dc.description.abstractNumerous studies using various techniques and methodologies have demonstrated distinctive responses to nouns and verbs both at the behavioral and neurological levels. However, since the great majority of these studies involved tasks employing pictorial stimuli and languages with rich inflectional morphology, it is not clear whether word class effects resulted from semantic differences between objects and actions or different inflectional operations associated with the two word classes. Such shortcomings were addressed in this study by using a language with impoverished inflectional morphology - Chinese. Both concrete and abstract words were included, while controlling for nuisance variables between the two word classes, including imageability, word frequency, age-of-acquisition, and number of stroke. Participants were asked to judge the semantic relatedness of noun or verb pairs by pressing different buttons. The results revealed specific neural correlates for verb class in left lateral temporal and inferior frontal regions. Furthermore, the patterns of neural distribution of nouns and verbs were consistent with observations from Indo-European languages. Plausible accounts for neural separation of word classes were considered. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisteden_US
dc.subject.meshLanguageen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulationen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Timeen_US
dc.subject.meshSemanticsen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleDissociative neural correlates of semantic processing of nouns and verbs in Chinese - A language with minimal inflectional morphologyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, SP: splaw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, SP=rp00920en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.06.039en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21741486-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052147891en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros202609-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052147891&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume58en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage912en_US
dc.identifier.epage922en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1053-8119-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294940700023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, X=36497863400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, SP=7202242088en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHan, Z=7402859192en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhu, C=23096746200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBi, Y=8879366900en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9544484-

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