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Article: The Relationship Between Semantic Short-Term Memory and Immediate Serial Recall of Known and Unknown Words and Nonwords: Data From Two Chinese Individuals With Aphasia

TitleThe Relationship Between Semantic Short-Term Memory and Immediate Serial Recall of Known and Unknown Words and Nonwords: Data From Two Chinese Individuals With Aphasia
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/xlm.html
Citation
Journal Of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory And Cognition, 2008, v. 34 n. 4, p. 900-917 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present study investigated verbal recall of semantically preserved and degraded words and nonwords by taking into consideration the status of one's semantic short-term memory (STM). Two experiments were conducted on 2 Chinese individuals with aphasia. The first experiment showed that they had largely preserved phonological processing abilities accompanied by mild but comparable semantic processing deficits; however, their performance on STM tasks revealed a double dissociation. The second experiment found that the participant with more preserved semantic STM had better recall of known words and nonwords than of their unknown counterparts, whereas such effects were absent in the patient with severe semantic STM deficit. The results are compatible with models that assume separate phonological and semantic STM components, such as that of R. C. Martin, M. Lesch, and M. Bartha (1999). In addition, the distribution of error types was different from previous studies. This is discussed in terms of the methodology of the authors' experiments and current views regarding the nature of semantic STM and representations in the Chinese mental lexicon. © 2008 American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175305
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.776
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.226
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:04Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory And Cognition, 2008, v. 34 n. 4, p. 900-917en_US
dc.identifier.issn0278-7393en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175305-
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated verbal recall of semantically preserved and degraded words and nonwords by taking into consideration the status of one's semantic short-term memory (STM). Two experiments were conducted on 2 Chinese individuals with aphasia. The first experiment showed that they had largely preserved phonological processing abilities accompanied by mild but comparable semantic processing deficits; however, their performance on STM tasks revealed a double dissociation. The second experiment found that the participant with more preserved semantic STM had better recall of known words and nonwords than of their unknown counterparts, whereas such effects were absent in the patient with severe semantic STM deficit. The results are compatible with models that assume separate phonological and semantic STM components, such as that of R. C. Martin, M. Lesch, and M. Bartha (1999). In addition, the distribution of error types was different from previous studies. This is discussed in terms of the methodology of the authors' experiments and current views regarding the nature of semantic STM and representations in the Chinese mental lexicon. © 2008 American Psychological Association.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/xlm.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognitionen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. Copyright © American Psychological Association.-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAphasia, Wernicke - Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshMemory, Short-Termen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Recallen_US
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshPhoneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSemanticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSeverity Of Illness Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshSpeech Perceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshVocabularyen_US
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Semantic Short-Term Memory and Immediate Serial Recall of Known and Unknown Words and Nonwords: Data From Two Chinese Individuals With Aphasiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, SP: splaw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, SP=rp00920en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0278-7393.34.4.900en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18605877-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-47549097140en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros147386-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-47549097140&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage900en_US
dc.identifier.epage917en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257467600015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, W=13307653300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, SP=7202242088en_US

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