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Article: Lexical tone disruption in Cantonese aphasic speakers

TitleLexical tone disruption in Cantonese aphasic speakers
Authors
KeywordsAphasia
Chinese
Lexical Tone Disruption
Issue Date1995
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02699206.asp
Citation
Clinical Linguistics And Phonetics, 1995, v. 9 n. 1, p. 79-92 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study reports on the nature of tonal disruption in brain-damaged subjects. The language selected for investigation was Cantonese, a Chinese dialect spoken in southern China and Hong Kong with six lexical tones. Brain-damaged subjects were asked to identify and produce Cantonese words in isolation. It was found that lexical tone disruption is a generalized sign in aphasia. There was no evidence that there exists a particular pattern of tonal disruption in any specific type of aphasia. Results also indicated tonal disruption in both production and perception tasks. This impairment was often more severe with the perceptual ability than the production. Indeed, the data suggested that tonal disruption can be a disorder at either the phonological or phonetic level.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175256
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.617
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.483

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYiu, EMLen_US
dc.contributor.authorFok, AYYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:57:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:57:50Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Linguistics And Phonetics, 1995, v. 9 n. 1, p. 79-92en_US
dc.identifier.issn0269-9206en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175256-
dc.description.abstractThis study reports on the nature of tonal disruption in brain-damaged subjects. The language selected for investigation was Cantonese, a Chinese dialect spoken in southern China and Hong Kong with six lexical tones. Brain-damaged subjects were asked to identify and produce Cantonese words in isolation. It was found that lexical tone disruption is a generalized sign in aphasia. There was no evidence that there exists a particular pattern of tonal disruption in any specific type of aphasia. Results also indicated tonal disruption in both production and perception tasks. This impairment was often more severe with the perceptual ability than the production. Indeed, the data suggested that tonal disruption can be a disorder at either the phonological or phonetic level.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02699206.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Linguistics and Phoneticsen_US
dc.subjectAphasiaen_US
dc.subjectChineseen_US
dc.subjectLexical Tone Disruptionen_US
dc.titleLexical tone disruption in Cantonese aphasic speakersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, EML: eyiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, EML=rp00981en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028918816en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage79en_US
dc.identifier.epage92en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, EML=7003337895en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFok, AYY=7006493511en_US

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