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Article: Down's syndrome and the acquisition of phonology by Cantonese-speaking children

TitleDown's syndrome and the acquisition of phonology by Cantonese-speaking children
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0964-2633
Citation
Journal Of Intellectual Disability Research, 1994, v. 38 n. 5, p. 501-517 How to Cite?
AbstractThe phonological abilities of two groups of 4-9-year-old intellectually impaired Cantonese-speaking children are described. Children with Down's syndrome did not differ from matched non-Down's syndrome controls in terms of a lexical comprehension measure, the size of their phoneme repertoires, the range of sounds affected by articulatory imprecision, or the number of consonants, vowels or tones produced in error. However, the types of errors made by the Down's syndrome children were different from those made by the control subjects. Cantonese-speaking children with Down's syndrome, as compared with controls, made a greater number of inconsistent errors, were more likely to produce non-developmental errors and were better in imitation than in spontaneous production. Despite extensive differences between the phonological structures of Cantonese and English, children with Down's syndrome acquiring these languages show the same characteristic pattern of speech errors. One unexpected finding was that the control group of non-Down's syndrome children failed to present with delayed phonological development typically reported for their English-speaking counterparts. The argument made is that cross-linguistic studies of intellectually impaired children's language acquisition provide evidence concerning language-specific characteristics of impairment, as opposed to those characteristics that, remaining constant across languages, are an integral part of the disorder. The results reported here support the hypothesis that the speech disorder typically associated with Down's syndrome arises from impaired phonological planning, i.e. a cognitive linguistic deficit.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175248
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.07
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.088
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSo, LKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, BJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:57:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:57:48Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Intellectual Disability Research, 1994, v. 38 n. 5, p. 501-517en_US
dc.identifier.issn0964-2633en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175248-
dc.description.abstractThe phonological abilities of two groups of 4-9-year-old intellectually impaired Cantonese-speaking children are described. Children with Down's syndrome did not differ from matched non-Down's syndrome controls in terms of a lexical comprehension measure, the size of their phoneme repertoires, the range of sounds affected by articulatory imprecision, or the number of consonants, vowels or tones produced in error. However, the types of errors made by the Down's syndrome children were different from those made by the control subjects. Cantonese-speaking children with Down's syndrome, as compared with controls, made a greater number of inconsistent errors, were more likely to produce non-developmental errors and were better in imitation than in spontaneous production. Despite extensive differences between the phonological structures of Cantonese and English, children with Down's syndrome acquiring these languages show the same characteristic pattern of speech errors. One unexpected finding was that the control group of non-Down's syndrome children failed to present with delayed phonological development typically reported for their English-speaking counterparts. The argument made is that cross-linguistic studies of intellectually impaired children's language acquisition provide evidence concerning language-specific characteristics of impairment, as opposed to those characteristics that, remaining constant across languages, are an integral part of the disorder. The results reported here support the hypothesis that the speech disorder typically associated with Down's syndrome arises from impaired phonological planning, i.e. a cognitive linguistic deficit.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0964-2633en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Intellectual Disability Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Intellectual Disability Research. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshArticulation Disorders - Diagnosis - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparisonen_US
dc.subject.meshDown Syndrome - Diagnosis - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIntelligenceen_US
dc.subject.meshLanguageen_US
dc.subject.meshLanguage Development Disorders - Diagnosis - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhoneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSpeech Perceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshSpeech Production Measurementen_US
dc.subject.meshVocabularyen_US
dc.titleDown's syndrome and the acquisition of phonology by Cantonese-speaking childrenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSo, LKH: lydiaso@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySo, LKH=rp00959en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid7841688-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027999476en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros5725-
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage501en_US
dc.identifier.epage517en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994PM10100005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, LKH=35977878100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDodd, BJ=7006624191en_US

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