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Article: Large convection cells as the source of Betelgeuse's extended atmosphere

TitleLarge convection cells as the source of Betelgeuse's extended atmosphere
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature
Citation
Nature, 1998, v. 392 n. 6676, p. 575-577 How to Cite?
AbstractSupergiant stars such as Betelgeuse have very extended atmospheres, the properties of which are poorly understood. Alfven waves, acoustic waves and radial pulsations have all been suggested as likely mechanisms for elevating these atmospheres and driving the massive outflows of gas seen in these stars: such mechanisms would heat the atmosphere from below, and there are indeed observations showing that Betelgeuse's extended atmosphere is hotter than the underlying photosphere. Here we report radio observations of Betelgeuse that reveal the temperature structure of the extended atmosphere from two to seven times the photospheric radius. Close to the star, we find that the atmosphere has an irregular structure, and a temperature (3,450 ± 850 K) consistent with the photospheric temperature but much lower than that of gas in the same region probed by optical and ultraviolet observations. This cooler gas decreases steadily in temperature with radius, reaching 1,370 ± 330 K by seven stellar radii. The cool gas coexists with the hot chromospheric gas, but must be much more abundant as it dominates the radio emission. Our results suggest that a few inhomogeneously distributed large convective cells (which are widely believed to be present in such stars) are responsible for lifting the cooler photospheric gas into the atmosphere; radiation pressure on dust grains that condense from this gas may then drive Betelgeuse's outflow.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174767
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 38.138
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 21.936
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLim, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarilli, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeasley, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarson, RGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:47:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:47:19Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationNature, 1998, v. 392 n. 6676, p. 575-577en_US
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174767-
dc.description.abstractSupergiant stars such as Betelgeuse have very extended atmospheres, the properties of which are poorly understood. Alfven waves, acoustic waves and radial pulsations have all been suggested as likely mechanisms for elevating these atmospheres and driving the massive outflows of gas seen in these stars: such mechanisms would heat the atmosphere from below, and there are indeed observations showing that Betelgeuse's extended atmosphere is hotter than the underlying photosphere. Here we report radio observations of Betelgeuse that reveal the temperature structure of the extended atmosphere from two to seven times the photospheric radius. Close to the star, we find that the atmosphere has an irregular structure, and a temperature (3,450 ± 850 K) consistent with the photospheric temperature but much lower than that of gas in the same region probed by optical and ultraviolet observations. This cooler gas decreases steadily in temperature with radius, reaching 1,370 ± 330 K by seven stellar radii. The cool gas coexists with the hot chromospheric gas, but must be much more abundant as it dominates the radio emission. Our results suggest that a few inhomogeneously distributed large convective cells (which are widely believed to be present in such stars) are responsible for lifting the cooler photospheric gas into the atmosphere; radiation pressure on dust grains that condense from this gas may then drive Betelgeuse's outflow.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNatureen_US
dc.titleLarge convection cells as the source of Betelgeuse's extended atmosphereen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLim, J: jjlim@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLim, J=rp00745en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/33352en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032499202en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032499202&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume392en_US
dc.identifier.issue6676en_US
dc.identifier.spage575en_US
dc.identifier.epage577en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000072987200050-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLim, J=7403453870en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCarilli, CL=7005531977en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhite, SM=7404079906en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBeasley, AJ=7005579504en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarson, RG=6603645827en_US

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