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postgraduate thesis: The role of secretin in appetite control

TitleThe role of secretin in appetite control
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Chow, BKC
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Cheng, Y. [鄭婉兒]. (2011). The role of secretin in appetite control. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4775295
AbstractMultiple gut hormones are involved in the regulation of food intake. Secretin (SCT), a classical gut hormone, is released into the circulation from the duodenal S-cells when acidic chyme enters the duodenum and performs the major functions of delaying gastric emptying, stimulating fluid secretion from pancreas and liver to optimize the digestion process. In recent years, SCT and its receptor (SCTR) have been identified in discrete nuclei of the hypothalamus, including the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the arcuate nucleus (Arc). The occurrence of SCT and SCTR in the brain regions that are engaged in regulating body energy homeostasis and the release pattern of SCT after meals support a functional role of SCT in appetite control. In this study, the effect of SCT on feeding behavior was investigated using wild-type (wt), SCT?/?, and SCT receptor-deficient (SCTR?/?) mice. We found that both central and peripheral administration of SCT could reduce food intake in wt but not in SCTR?/?mice. SCT induce Fos expression in the PVN and Arc, suggesting the activation of hypothalamic feeding centers by this peptide. Consistent with this notion, SCT was found to increase proopiomelanocortin (POMC), but reduce agouti-related protein (AgRP) transcripts in the Arc, and augment thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) mRNA expression in the PVN. In addition, pretreatment with SHU9119, an antagonist for MC4R, abolished the anorexia induced by SCT, suggesting that SCT may inhibit food intake via a melanocortin-dependent pathway. Gut hormones signals the brain to modulate the feeding behavior via the vagal afferent nerve, bloodstream or both. Here we showed that peripheral SCT-induced anorexia was attenuated in mice with subdiaphragmatic vagotomy, capsaicin treatment and bilateral midbrain transections. In summary, our data identify peripheral SCT as an anorectic peptide exerting its action via the melanocortin system and the vagal afferent contributes a major route in mediating the inhibitory effect of peripheral SCT on food intake. The present findings advance our understanding of the role of gut hormones in the regulation of appetite.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectSecretin.
Appetite - Physiological aspects.
Dept/ProgramBiological Sciences

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorChow, BKC-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Yuen-yee.-
dc.contributor.author鄭婉兒.-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationCheng, Y. [鄭婉兒]. (2011). The role of secretin in appetite control. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4775295-
dc.description.abstractMultiple gut hormones are involved in the regulation of food intake. Secretin (SCT), a classical gut hormone, is released into the circulation from the duodenal S-cells when acidic chyme enters the duodenum and performs the major functions of delaying gastric emptying, stimulating fluid secretion from pancreas and liver to optimize the digestion process. In recent years, SCT and its receptor (SCTR) have been identified in discrete nuclei of the hypothalamus, including the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the arcuate nucleus (Arc). The occurrence of SCT and SCTR in the brain regions that are engaged in regulating body energy homeostasis and the release pattern of SCT after meals support a functional role of SCT in appetite control. In this study, the effect of SCT on feeding behavior was investigated using wild-type (wt), SCT?/?, and SCT receptor-deficient (SCTR?/?) mice. We found that both central and peripheral administration of SCT could reduce food intake in wt but not in SCTR?/?mice. SCT induce Fos expression in the PVN and Arc, suggesting the activation of hypothalamic feeding centers by this peptide. Consistent with this notion, SCT was found to increase proopiomelanocortin (POMC), but reduce agouti-related protein (AgRP) transcripts in the Arc, and augment thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) mRNA expression in the PVN. In addition, pretreatment with SHU9119, an antagonist for MC4R, abolished the anorexia induced by SCT, suggesting that SCT may inhibit food intake via a melanocortin-dependent pathway. Gut hormones signals the brain to modulate the feeding behavior via the vagal afferent nerve, bloodstream or both. Here we showed that peripheral SCT-induced anorexia was attenuated in mice with subdiaphragmatic vagotomy, capsaicin treatment and bilateral midbrain transections. In summary, our data identify peripheral SCT as an anorectic peptide exerting its action via the melanocortin system and the vagal afferent contributes a major route in mediating the inhibitory effect of peripheral SCT on food intake. The present findings advance our understanding of the role of gut hormones in the regulation of appetite.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47752956-
dc.subject.lcshSecretin.-
dc.subject.lcshAppetite - Physiological aspects.-
dc.titleThe role of secretin in appetite control-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4775295-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineBiological Sciences-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4775295-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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