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Postgraduate Thesis: Spatial heritage: examining terraces in urbanHong Kong as public space and communal heritage
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TitleSpatial heritage: examining terraces in urbanHong Kong as public space and communal heritage
 
AuthorsYu, Ka-sing.
余家聲.
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractEver since the 1841 arrival of British troops in Hong Kong have people decided staying in the city with rugged contours been finding solutions to face the geographical reality of the scarcity of land, whether are they European merchants or Chinese settlers. Public spaces that serve as a buffer and an extension to the private domain are of fundamental importance to the well-being of the people and the city. However in recent decades there is a prevailing trend to worship Western concept of public spaces such as squares and piazzas that were tailor-made to suit the habitual behavior of Europeans who and whose ancestors possess a strong culture of public living. The Western public spaces do not suit the mode of living of Chinese who are not used to exhibit themselves publicly and would prefer to stay close to their dwellings. The key issue addressed by this dissertation is that public spaces suiting the needs of Hong Kong people should learn from traditional urban public spaces for Chinese settlers who share if not identical, similar cultural background to us. Hong Kong Terraces that were formed by the British government to practically address the difficult circumstances of geographical, political and social factors are a valid example that has helped to solve the overcrowding problem and contributed to the history of the city. In other words, these are Hong Kong’s heritage public spaces that shall be treasured and learnt from. Given this, it is urgent to begin researching such spaces before they are erased from our sight. The dissertation will acknowledge Hong Kong Terraces as successful public spaces in Hong Kong, investigate the causes of formation, and identify their qualities with the illustration of several surviving cases. The research will provide alternative solutions and notes to the design of valid public spaces that shall help to improve Hong Kong urban life.
 
DegreeMaster of Science in Conservation
 
SubjectOpen spaces - China - Hong Kong.
Terrace houses - China - Hong Kong.
 
Dept/ProgramConservation
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYu, Ka-sing.
 
dc.contributor.author余家聲.
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2011
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractEver since the 1841 arrival of British troops in Hong Kong have people decided staying in the city with rugged contours been finding solutions to face the geographical reality of the scarcity of land, whether are they European merchants or Chinese settlers. Public spaces that serve as a buffer and an extension to the private domain are of fundamental importance to the well-being of the people and the city. However in recent decades there is a prevailing trend to worship Western concept of public spaces such as squares and piazzas that were tailor-made to suit the habitual behavior of Europeans who and whose ancestors possess a strong culture of public living. The Western public spaces do not suit the mode of living of Chinese who are not used to exhibit themselves publicly and would prefer to stay close to their dwellings. The key issue addressed by this dissertation is that public spaces suiting the needs of Hong Kong people should learn from traditional urban public spaces for Chinese settlers who share if not identical, similar cultural background to us. Hong Kong Terraces that were formed by the British government to practically address the difficult circumstances of geographical, political and social factors are a valid example that has helped to solve the overcrowding problem and contributed to the history of the city. In other words, these are Hong Kong’s heritage public spaces that shall be treasured and learnt from. Given this, it is urgent to begin researching such spaces before they are erased from our sight. The dissertation will acknowledge Hong Kong Terraces as successful public spaces in Hong Kong, investigate the causes of formation, and identify their qualities with the illustration of several surviving cases. The research will provide alternative solutions and notes to the design of valid public spaces that shall help to improve Hong Kong urban life.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineConservation
 
dc.description.thesislevelmaster's
 
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Science in Conservation
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4759570
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B4759570X
 
dc.subject.lcshOpen spaces - China - Hong Kong.
 
dc.subject.lcshTerrace houses - China - Hong Kong.
 
dc.titleSpatial heritage: examining terraces in urbanHong Kong as public space and communal heritage
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<description.abstract>&#65279;Ever since the 1841 arrival of British troops in Hong Kong have people decided staying in the city with rugged contours been finding solutions to face the geographical reality of the scarcity of land, whether are they European merchants or Chinese settlers.  Public spaces that serve as a buffer and an extension to the private domain are of fundamental importance to the well-being of the people and the city.  



However in recent decades there is a prevailing trend to worship Western concept of public spaces such as squares and piazzas that were tailor-made to suit the habitual behavior of Europeans who and whose ancestors possess a strong culture of public living. The Western public spaces do not suit the mode of living of Chinese who are not used to exhibit themselves publicly and would prefer to stay close to their dwellings.



The key issue addressed by this dissertation is that public spaces suiting the needs of Hong Kong people should learn from traditional urban public spaces for Chinese settlers who share if not identical, similar cultural background to us. Hong Kong Terraces that were formed by the British government to practically address the difficult circumstances of geographical, political and social factors are a valid example that has helped to solve the overcrowding problem and contributed to the history of the city. In other words, these are Hong Kong&#8217;s heritage public spaces that shall be treasured and learnt from.  Given this, it is urgent to begin researching such spaces before they are erased from our sight.



The dissertation will acknowledge Hong Kong Terraces as successful public spaces in Hong Kong, investigate the causes of formation, and identify their qualities with the illustration of several surviving cases. The research will provide alternative solutions and notes to the design of valid public spaces that shall help to improve Hong Kong urban life.</description.abstract>
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<rights>The author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.</rights>
<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
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<subject.lcsh>Open spaces - China - Hong Kong.</subject.lcsh>
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<date.hkucongregation>2011</date.hkucongregation>
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