File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Routine screening of intimate partner violence in the accident & emergency department of Hong Kong

TitleRoutine screening of intimate partner violence in the accident & emergency department of Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chau, W. D. [周偉蓮]. (2012). Routine screening of intimate partner violence in the accident & emergency department of Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4833520
AbstractIntimate partner violence (IPV) is a worldwide public health problem that causes a devastating effect on the survivors and their families, society and health care services. World Health Organization (2004) conducted multi-country study which shows the prevalence of female who were the survivors of IPV among the world ranged from 15% to 71%. Smith and Farole (2009) reflected that about 86% IPV was committed against women by men. Lau (2008) found the male to female ratio of IPV in Hong Kong was 1 to 7. In order to reduce IPV, the first step is screening (Leppa?koski, Astedt-Kurki, & Paavilainen, 2011). Self-disclosure of IPV is rare and unlikely (Todahl & Walters, 2011; Phelan, 2007; Schimanski & Hedgecock, 2009; Stith et al., 2004). Most of the survivors of IPV were not easily identified by nurses and doctors (Leppa?koski, Astedt-Kurki, & Paavilainen, 2011). Human, social, and economic cost of IPV is high. Early IPV screening is important. Early detection of IPV can help the survivors of IPV to have early intervention and prevention of future episodes (Perciaccante, Carey, & Dodson, 2010). Campbell (2002) also stated that routine screening maybe the most effective way to identify IPV. Mortality and morbidity can be reducing and it does more good than harm (Schimanski & Hedgecock, 2009). Lau (2008) stated that Emergency Department (ED) was an ideal place to study IPV in Hong Kong as police, primary care, social workers referred most IPV survivors to ED for further management. However, there is no routine screening of IPV in Hong Kong ED. The objectives of the dissertation are to search the literatures of screening of female IPV in ED and then conduct a quality assessment from these chosen literatures to synthesis the findings. The transferability and feasibility of the findings of the selected is assessed. The last objective is to develop an evidence based guideline, implementation and evaluation plan for application of routine IPV screening in Hong Kong ED.
DegreeMaster of Nursing
SubjectIntimate partner violence.
Dept/ProgramNursing Studies

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, Wai-lin, Dorothy.-
dc.contributor.author周偉蓮.-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationChau, W. D. [周偉蓮]. (2012). Routine screening of intimate partner violence in the accident & emergency department of Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4833520-
dc.description.abstractIntimate partner violence (IPV) is a worldwide public health problem that causes a devastating effect on the survivors and their families, society and health care services. World Health Organization (2004) conducted multi-country study which shows the prevalence of female who were the survivors of IPV among the world ranged from 15% to 71%. Smith and Farole (2009) reflected that about 86% IPV was committed against women by men. Lau (2008) found the male to female ratio of IPV in Hong Kong was 1 to 7. In order to reduce IPV, the first step is screening (Leppa?koski, Astedt-Kurki, & Paavilainen, 2011). Self-disclosure of IPV is rare and unlikely (Todahl & Walters, 2011; Phelan, 2007; Schimanski & Hedgecock, 2009; Stith et al., 2004). Most of the survivors of IPV were not easily identified by nurses and doctors (Leppa?koski, Astedt-Kurki, & Paavilainen, 2011). Human, social, and economic cost of IPV is high. Early IPV screening is important. Early detection of IPV can help the survivors of IPV to have early intervention and prevention of future episodes (Perciaccante, Carey, & Dodson, 2010). Campbell (2002) also stated that routine screening maybe the most effective way to identify IPV. Mortality and morbidity can be reducing and it does more good than harm (Schimanski & Hedgecock, 2009). Lau (2008) stated that Emergency Department (ED) was an ideal place to study IPV in Hong Kong as police, primary care, social workers referred most IPV survivors to ED for further management. However, there is no routine screening of IPV in Hong Kong ED. The objectives of the dissertation are to search the literatures of screening of female IPV in ED and then conduct a quality assessment from these chosen literatures to synthesis the findings. The transferability and feasibility of the findings of the selected is assessed. The last objective is to develop an evidence based guideline, implementation and evaluation plan for application of routine IPV screening in Hong Kong ED.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48335204-
dc.subject.lcshIntimate partner violence.-
dc.titleRoutine screening of intimate partner violence in the accident & emergency department of Hong Kong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4833520-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Nursing-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineNursing Studies-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4833520-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats