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Conference Paper: An examination of cluster nucleation of goss oriented grains formed during secondary recrystallisation in an Fe-3.2% Si electrical steel

TitleAn examination of cluster nucleation of goss oriented grains formed during secondary recrystallisation in an Fe-3.2% Si electrical steel
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherTrans Tech Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scientific.net
Citation
Materials Science Forum, 2007, v. 558-559 PART 1, p. 723-728 How to Cite?
AbstractThe idea that a single subgrain is sufficient to produce a single recrystallised grain is the simplest explanation for the recrystallisation process. Likewise, a single Goss oriented grain arising from the primary recrystallisation process is the simplest unit which can give rise to a secondary Goss oriented grain. More complicated cluster models, for example subgrain coalescence is also considered feasible for primary recrystallisation, clusters of Goss oriented grains might be another mechanism for forming Goss oriented secondary grains. This paper examines the cluster theory using material which is produced by the ARMCO process which requires two stages of rolling. In order to achieve this aim it is necessary to destroy the connectivity between individual Goss oriented grains by using thin foils derived from sheet which gives a strong Goss texture on conventional annealing. The foils were sectioned from the subsurface which had a strong η fibre after primary recrystallisation, and ranged in thickness from 18μm (the average grain size after primary recrystallisation) up to 80μm, which is the approximate thickness of the η textured layer. The central layer, which had the classical {111}〈hkl〉 primary recrystallised texture, was similarly processed, but this did not produce secondary recrystallisation. The experiment followed the secondary recrystallisation process in the same area using sequential annealing in a vacuum furnace by a combination of EBSD and Channelling contrast microscopy, The data does not support the high energy boundary hypothesis nor the CSL explanation. But it is clear that connectivity is important, because when this is destroyed by the thin foil two dimensional morphology, as it is in the thinnest foil, secondary recrystallisation does not occur.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174098
ISSN
2005 Impact Factor: 0.399
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDuggan, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuadir, MZen_US
dc.contributor.authorPenelle, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-14T06:20:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-14T06:20:51Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationMaterials Science Forum, 2007, v. 558-559 PART 1, p. 723-728en_US
dc.identifier.issn0255-5476en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174098-
dc.description.abstractThe idea that a single subgrain is sufficient to produce a single recrystallised grain is the simplest explanation for the recrystallisation process. Likewise, a single Goss oriented grain arising from the primary recrystallisation process is the simplest unit which can give rise to a secondary Goss oriented grain. More complicated cluster models, for example subgrain coalescence is also considered feasible for primary recrystallisation, clusters of Goss oriented grains might be another mechanism for forming Goss oriented secondary grains. This paper examines the cluster theory using material which is produced by the ARMCO process which requires two stages of rolling. In order to achieve this aim it is necessary to destroy the connectivity between individual Goss oriented grains by using thin foils derived from sheet which gives a strong Goss texture on conventional annealing. The foils were sectioned from the subsurface which had a strong η fibre after primary recrystallisation, and ranged in thickness from 18μm (the average grain size after primary recrystallisation) up to 80μm, which is the approximate thickness of the η textured layer. The central layer, which had the classical {111}〈hkl〉 primary recrystallised texture, was similarly processed, but this did not produce secondary recrystallisation. The experiment followed the secondary recrystallisation process in the same area using sequential annealing in a vacuum furnace by a combination of EBSD and Channelling contrast microscopy, The data does not support the high energy boundary hypothesis nor the CSL explanation. But it is clear that connectivity is important, because when this is destroyed by the thin foil two dimensional morphology, as it is in the thinnest foil, secondary recrystallisation does not occur.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTrans Tech Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scientific.neten_US
dc.relation.ispartofMaterials Science Forumen_US
dc.titleAn examination of cluster nucleation of goss oriented grains formed during secondary recrystallisation in an Fe-3.2% Si electrical steelen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailDuggan, BJ: bjduggan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDuggan, BJ=rp01686en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38349167582en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38349167582&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume558-559en_US
dc.identifier.issuePART 1en_US
dc.identifier.spage723en_US
dc.identifier.epage728en_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDuggan, BJ=7005772998en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQuadir, MZ=6603710687en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPenelle, R=7005225550en_US

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