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Postgraduate Thesis: Proposing a frame-based principle for fictional translation: with special reference to Eileen Chang'stranslation
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TitleProposing a frame-based principle for fictional translation: with special reference to Eileen Chang'stranslation
 
AuthorsDeng, Jing
邓静
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractIn the light of frame semantics, a linguistic sign is understood in terms of frame, which is a structured background of knowledge and experiences. Meanings are thus relativized to frames. With a holistic consideration of interrelated elements such as prototype, context, schema and semantic memory, this meaning theory provides a promising starting point for an integrative theory of translation. Adopting a frame semantic approach, the thesis looks into the mechanism of the translator’s decision-making on meaning transfer in fictional translation. It proposes that a translator’s decisions are generally controlled by the “Proper Scene Principle”, which requires that the translator should ensure that the target reader can generally gain access through the target text (TT) to proper scenes to construct a coherent text world comparable to the one underlying the source text (ST). The principle consists of two maxims, i.e. the Maxim of Relevance and the Maxim of Coherence, of which the former is concerned with the relationship between a ST scene and a TT scene, and the latter, the integrity of the network of scenes evoked by the TT. To test the validity of the Proper Scene Principle, a detailed model of text comprehension is delineated, which specifies the progressive path of comprehension from individual semantic structures to a holistic text world, taking into account such factors as the framing pattern, framing criteria, highlighted and basic frame features, perspective, scene extension and scene-scene relations. Authentic data taken from Eileen Chang’s conventional translation and self-translation are carefully categorized and discussed within the framework of this model. As evidenced by ample exemplifications, the frame/scene notion and the prototypical approach to the ST-TT relation are of both explanatory strength and problem-solving advantages for fictional translation. The proposed principle is proved to be effective, which may well serve as a diagnostic tool for translation problems, a yardstick for translation quality and a reference point for the translator’s obligation and freedom. As a whole, being a comprehensive investigation that concerns both theory and practice, the thesis attempts to shed some new light on certain basic issues of translation studies and it is of particular relevance to the practice of literary translation. The concepts and methods developed in the thesis might also contribute to the progress of frame semantic theory.
 
AdvisorsPoon, JHK
 
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
 
SubjectChinese fiction - Translations into English.
 
Dept/ProgramChinese
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.advisorPoon, JHK
 
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Jing
 
dc.contributor.author邓静
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2010
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractIn the light of frame semantics, a linguistic sign is understood in terms of frame, which is a structured background of knowledge and experiences. Meanings are thus relativized to frames. With a holistic consideration of interrelated elements such as prototype, context, schema and semantic memory, this meaning theory provides a promising starting point for an integrative theory of translation. Adopting a frame semantic approach, the thesis looks into the mechanism of the translator’s decision-making on meaning transfer in fictional translation. It proposes that a translator’s decisions are generally controlled by the “Proper Scene Principle”, which requires that the translator should ensure that the target reader can generally gain access through the target text (TT) to proper scenes to construct a coherent text world comparable to the one underlying the source text (ST). The principle consists of two maxims, i.e. the Maxim of Relevance and the Maxim of Coherence, of which the former is concerned with the relationship between a ST scene and a TT scene, and the latter, the integrity of the network of scenes evoked by the TT. To test the validity of the Proper Scene Principle, a detailed model of text comprehension is delineated, which specifies the progressive path of comprehension from individual semantic structures to a holistic text world, taking into account such factors as the framing pattern, framing criteria, highlighted and basic frame features, perspective, scene extension and scene-scene relations. Authentic data taken from Eileen Chang’s conventional translation and self-translation are carefully categorized and discussed within the framework of this model. As evidenced by ample exemplifications, the frame/scene notion and the prototypical approach to the ST-TT relation are of both explanatory strength and problem-solving advantages for fictional translation. The proposed principle is proved to be effective, which may well serve as a diagnostic tool for translation problems, a yardstick for translation quality and a reference point for the translator’s obligation and freedom. As a whole, being a comprehensive investigation that concerns both theory and practice, the thesis attempts to shed some new light on certain basic issues of translation studies and it is of particular relevance to the practice of literary translation. The concepts and methods developed in the thesis might also contribute to the progress of frame semantic theory.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineChinese
 
dc.description.thesisleveldoctoral
 
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4437253
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B4437253X
 
dc.subject.lcshChinese fiction - Translations into English.
 
dc.titleProposing a frame-based principle for fictional translation: with special reference to Eileen Chang'stranslation
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<date.issued>2010</date.issued>
<description.abstract>&#65279;In the light of frame semantics, a linguistic sign is understood in terms of frame, which is a structured background of knowledge and experiences. Meanings are thus relativized to frames. With a holistic consideration of interrelated elements such as prototype, context, schema and semantic memory, this meaning theory provides a promising starting point for an integrative theory of translation. Adopting a frame semantic approach, the thesis looks into the mechanism of the translator&#8217;s decision-making on meaning transfer in fictional translation. It proposes that a translator&#8217;s decisions are generally controlled by the &#8220;Proper Scene Principle&#8221;, which requires that the translator should ensure that the target reader can generally gain access through the target text (TT) to proper scenes to construct a coherent text world comparable to the one underlying the source text (ST). The principle consists of two maxims, i.e. the Maxim of Relevance and the Maxim of Coherence, of which the former is concerned with the relationship between a ST scene and a TT scene, and the latter, the integrity of the network of scenes evoked by the TT.

To test the validity of the Proper Scene Principle, a detailed model of text comprehension is delineated, which specifies the progressive path of comprehension from individual semantic structures to a holistic text world, taking into account such factors as the framing pattern, framing criteria, highlighted and basic frame features, perspective, scene extension and scene-scene relations. Authentic data taken from Eileen Chang&#8217;s conventional translation and self-translation are carefully categorized and discussed within the framework of this model. As evidenced by ample exemplifications, the frame/scene notion and the prototypical approach to the ST-TT relation are of both explanatory strength and problem-solving advantages for fictional translation. The proposed principle is proved to be effective, which may well serve as a diagnostic tool for translation problems, a yardstick for translation quality and a reference point for the translator&#8217;s obligation and freedom. As a whole, being a comprehensive investigation that concerns both theory and practice, the thesis attempts to shed some new light on certain basic issues of translation studies and it is of particular relevance to the practice of literary translation. The concepts and methods developed in the thesis might also contribute to the progress of frame semantic theory.</description.abstract>
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