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Conference Paper: Attrition and erosion: restorative planning and performance

TitleAttrition and erosion: restorative planning and performance
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherRoyal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.racds.org
Citation
21st Convocation of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons, Perth, Australia, 31 March-4 April 2010. In Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons, 2012, v. 21, p. 97-100 How to Cite?
AbstractThe number of patients presenting with severe attrition and associated erosion is increasing in frequency. Treatment of this patient group is very challenging as it is simply not just a case of replacing lost tooth tissue, but also trying to identify and then eliminate the aetiological factors responsible for the loss of tooth structure. In most cases restorative treatment involves extensive rehabilitation of the dentition to restore the aesthetics and function and also to prevent further tooth loss. Such treatment often involves a multidisciplinary approach to eliminate and/or reduce causative factors prior to defi nitive restoration of teeth. Treatment needs to focus on quick intervention when the problem has been identifi ed and diagnosed. Restorative treatment involves careful if not complex planning culminating in the establishment of a well defi ned and ongoing maintenance plan. Long-term success of treatment is centred on the maintenance phase. Current restorative options include the use of extensive resin composite build-ups. This is often the best initial starting point as it allows for adjustments, as well as being a reversible and more conservative procedure. The use of indirect restorations is likely to provide a longer lasting outcome after initial stabilization, whether it is metal- or ceramic-based or a combination.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173994
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBurrow, MF-
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-12T03:16:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-12T03:16:27Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citation21st Convocation of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons, Perth, Australia, 31 March-4 April 2010. In Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons, 2012, v. 21, p. 97-100-
dc.identifier.issn0158-1570-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173994-
dc.description.abstractThe number of patients presenting with severe attrition and associated erosion is increasing in frequency. Treatment of this patient group is very challenging as it is simply not just a case of replacing lost tooth tissue, but also trying to identify and then eliminate the aetiological factors responsible for the loss of tooth structure. In most cases restorative treatment involves extensive rehabilitation of the dentition to restore the aesthetics and function and also to prevent further tooth loss. Such treatment often involves a multidisciplinary approach to eliminate and/or reduce causative factors prior to defi nitive restoration of teeth. Treatment needs to focus on quick intervention when the problem has been identifi ed and diagnosed. Restorative treatment involves careful if not complex planning culminating in the establishment of a well defi ned and ongoing maintenance plan. Long-term success of treatment is centred on the maintenance phase. Current restorative options include the use of extensive resin composite build-ups. This is often the best initial starting point as it allows for adjustments, as well as being a reversible and more conservative procedure. The use of indirect restorations is likely to provide a longer lasting outcome after initial stabilization, whether it is metal- or ceramic-based or a combination.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoyal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.racds.org-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons-
dc.titleAttrition and erosion: restorative planning and performanceen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailBurrow, MF: mfburr58@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.hkuros201817-
dc.identifier.volume21-
dc.identifier.spage97-
dc.identifier.epage100-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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