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Postgraduate Thesis: Characterization by electron microscopy of dengue virus egress using dengue recombinant subviral particle (RSPs) as a model
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TitleCharacterization by electron microscopy of dengue virus egress using dengue recombinant subviral particle (RSPs) as a model
 
AuthorsLo, Chung-yan, Joanne.
羅頌恩.
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractDengue is the most common mosquito-borne human disease, leading to 2.5 billion people at risk, 50-100 millions infections each year worldwide and among them, 500 000 severe dengue cases (dengue hemorrhagic fever, DHF/ dengue shock syndrome, DSS) plus more than 20 000 deaths. It can be caused by any of four dengue virus serotypes, which are antigenicly distinct and belong to the Flaviviridae family, genus Flavivirus. However, up till now there is no specific drug and vaccine against dengue. Understanding mechanisms developed by dengue virus to exploit host cells during all stages of the replication cycle is a first step towards the rationale design of anti-viral strategies. Very little is known about the late stages, which consist of assembly, budding and secretion of the virus. It is therefore very important to develop tools in order to study the egress of the virus. In this study, I investigated a stable cell line named Hela-prME that expresses serotype 1 dengue virus (DENV-1) prM and E native structural envelope proteins and constitutively produces dengue recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). Biochemical characterization of DENV-1 RSPs has validated that this cell line is a potential tool to study the dengue viral late-stage. Indeed, the maturation process observed with RSPs is similar to the pathway described for real virus (cleavage of prM fragment, homodimerization of E, acquisition of complex sugars). To better understand and depict the dengue virus late-stage secretion, I combined various electron microscopy (EM) techniques e.g. classical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), negative staining, immunogold labeling on cryo-ultrathin sections (Tokuyashu method) and tomography (ET) with such RSPs tool. The EM results obtained illustrate that electron dense particles and tubules labeled by antibodies directed against E and prM proteins were abundantly found in the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-related cisternae of HeLa prME cells. Epositive particles were also found in other structures such as Golgi stacks and vesicles nearby as well as in aggregates with electron dense materials inside and surrounded by membrane. These particles are most likely corresponding to DENV-1 RSPs whereas the tubules may be other structures induced by assembly of prM and E proteins. This study has clearly shown that DENV-1 RSPs assemble in the ER and transport through the secretory pathway before being released. This work further validates the use of dengue RSPs and RSPs-producing cells as a model to study viral egress.
 
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
 
SubjectElectron microscopes.
Dengue viruses.
 
Dept/ProgramPathology
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLo, Chung-yan, Joanne.
 
dc.contributor.author羅頌恩.
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2012
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractDengue is the most common mosquito-borne human disease, leading to 2.5 billion people at risk, 50-100 millions infections each year worldwide and among them, 500 000 severe dengue cases (dengue hemorrhagic fever, DHF/ dengue shock syndrome, DSS) plus more than 20 000 deaths. It can be caused by any of four dengue virus serotypes, which are antigenicly distinct and belong to the Flaviviridae family, genus Flavivirus. However, up till now there is no specific drug and vaccine against dengue. Understanding mechanisms developed by dengue virus to exploit host cells during all stages of the replication cycle is a first step towards the rationale design of anti-viral strategies. Very little is known about the late stages, which consist of assembly, budding and secretion of the virus. It is therefore very important to develop tools in order to study the egress of the virus. In this study, I investigated a stable cell line named Hela-prME that expresses serotype 1 dengue virus (DENV-1) prM and E native structural envelope proteins and constitutively produces dengue recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). Biochemical characterization of DENV-1 RSPs has validated that this cell line is a potential tool to study the dengue viral late-stage. Indeed, the maturation process observed with RSPs is similar to the pathway described for real virus (cleavage of prM fragment, homodimerization of E, acquisition of complex sugars). To better understand and depict the dengue virus late-stage secretion, I combined various electron microscopy (EM) techniques e.g. classical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), negative staining, immunogold labeling on cryo-ultrathin sections (Tokuyashu method) and tomography (ET) with such RSPs tool. The EM results obtained illustrate that electron dense particles and tubules labeled by antibodies directed against E and prM proteins were abundantly found in the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-related cisternae of HeLa prME cells. Epositive particles were also found in other structures such as Golgi stacks and vesicles nearby as well as in aggregates with electron dense materials inside and surrounded by membrane. These particles are most likely corresponding to DENV-1 RSPs whereas the tubules may be other structures induced by assembly of prM and E proteins. This study has clearly shown that DENV-1 RSPs assemble in the ER and transport through the secretory pathway before being released. This work further validates the use of dengue RSPs and RSPs-producing cells as a model to study viral egress.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePathology
 
dc.description.thesislevelmaster's
 
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4833011
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48330115
 
dc.subject.lcshElectron microscopes.
 
dc.subject.lcshDengue viruses.
 
dc.titleCharacterization by electron microscopy of dengue virus egress using dengue recombinant subviral particle (RSPs) as a model
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<description.abstract>&#65279;Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne human disease, leading to 2.5 billion people at risk, 50-100 millions infections each year worldwide and among them, 500 000 severe dengue cases (dengue hemorrhagic fever, DHF/ dengue shock syndrome, DSS) plus more than 20 000 deaths. It can be caused by any of four dengue virus serotypes, which are antigenicly distinct and belong to the Flaviviridae family, genus Flavivirus. However, up till now there is no specific drug and vaccine against dengue. Understanding mechanisms developed by dengue virus to exploit host cells during all stages of the replication cycle is a first step towards the rationale design of anti-viral strategies. Very little is known about the late stages, which consist of assembly, budding and secretion of the virus. It is therefore very important to develop tools in order to study the egress of the virus. 



In this study, I investigated a stable cell line named Hela-prME that expresses serotype 1 dengue virus (DENV-1) prM and E native structural envelope proteins and constitutively produces dengue recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). Biochemical characterization of DENV-1 RSPs has validated that this cell line is a potential tool to study the dengue viral late-stage. Indeed, the maturation process observed with RSPs is similar to the pathway described for real virus (cleavage of prM fragment, homodimerization of E, acquisition of complex sugars).



To better understand and depict the dengue virus late-stage secretion, I combined various electron microscopy (EM) techniques e.g. classical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), negative staining, immunogold labeling on cryo-ultrathin sections (Tokuyashu method) and tomography (ET) with such RSPs tool.



The EM results obtained illustrate that electron dense particles and tubules labeled by antibodies directed against E and prM proteins were abundantly found in the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-related cisternae of HeLa prME cells. Epositive particles were also found in other structures such as Golgi stacks and vesicles nearby as well as in aggregates with electron dense materials inside and surrounded by membrane. These particles are most likely corresponding to DENV-1 RSPs whereas the tubules may be other structures induced by assembly of prM and E proteins.



This study has clearly shown that DENV-1 RSPs assemble in the ER and transport through the secretory pathway before being released. This work further validates the use of dengue RSPs and RSPs-producing cells as a model to study viral egress.</description.abstract>
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