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Postgraduate Thesis: Cognitive reading strategies instruction for children with specific language impairment
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TitleCognitive reading strategies instruction for children with specific language impairment
 
AuthorsLau, Ka-ming.
劉家明.
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractThe primarily goal of this study was to examine the patterns of cognitive and language processing of children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and how they related to their text comprehension, interpreted within constructivism. The study aimed to characterize the difference in language, character decoding, metacognitive processing and text comprehension between children with SLI and those under typical development; to identify the inter-relationships among their language processing, character decoding, metacognitive processing and text comprehension; and to investigate how the implementation of cognitive reading strategies instruction change their language processing, character decoding, metacognitive processing, belief towards reading and text comprehension. Two studies were carried out. In Study One, 73 participants were recruited from two Hong Kong primary schools; they were at second and third grade, 42 were diagnosed of SLI and the other were under typical development. Standardized instruments were used to tap children’s language processing and character decoding respectively. Researcher developed Metacognitive Processing Scale were adopted to rate their metacognitive and deep processing of text. A set of comprehension test, comprised of forced-choice inferential questions and two recall tasks, were used to assess their depth in understanding different types of text. Analyses indicated that SLI students did not only score poorer in language processing, but also in character decoding, metacognitive processing and text comprehension. Further analyses of both the entire sample and the SLI sample, indicated that there were significant correlations between character decoding, language processing, metacognitive processing with children’s text comprehension scores. In Study Two, there were 40 participants recruited from the SLI sample of the Study One. Cognitive reading strategy instruction program were developed. 21 participants was randomly selected to receive the experimental instruction and the another 19 were under conventional instruction as control. Besides the measures used in the Study One, interviews and teacher-reporting questionnaires were used to tap children’s belief towards reading and their classroom engagement. Analysis of pre-instruction and post-instruction tests indicated the experimental children showed significantly better progress on their oral language, text comprehension and belief about reading. Both the experimental and the control group showed similar progress on character decoding. The study offers both theoretical and educational contribution on the literacy development among the population of SLI. It identifies the role of metacognitive processing on literacy achievement. It provides the evidence of implementing cognitively-based reading strategies for literacy instruction for children with SLI within Chinese context. Upon the introduction of inclusive education, teachers now face students with much wider diversity, including a significant number of children with SLI. Possible collaboration between frontline teachers and speech therapists in designing potential classroom activities is discussed.
 
DegreeDoctor of Education
 
SubjectSpecific language impairment in children - China - Hong Kong.
Reading (Primary) - China - Hong Kong.
Cognitive learning theory.
 
Dept/ProgramEducation
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLau, Ka-ming.
 
dc.contributor.author劉家明.
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2012
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThe primarily goal of this study was to examine the patterns of cognitive and language processing of children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and how they related to their text comprehension, interpreted within constructivism. The study aimed to characterize the difference in language, character decoding, metacognitive processing and text comprehension between children with SLI and those under typical development; to identify the inter-relationships among their language processing, character decoding, metacognitive processing and text comprehension; and to investigate how the implementation of cognitive reading strategies instruction change their language processing, character decoding, metacognitive processing, belief towards reading and text comprehension. Two studies were carried out. In Study One, 73 participants were recruited from two Hong Kong primary schools; they were at second and third grade, 42 were diagnosed of SLI and the other were under typical development. Standardized instruments were used to tap children’s language processing and character decoding respectively. Researcher developed Metacognitive Processing Scale were adopted to rate their metacognitive and deep processing of text. A set of comprehension test, comprised of forced-choice inferential questions and two recall tasks, were used to assess their depth in understanding different types of text. Analyses indicated that SLI students did not only score poorer in language processing, but also in character decoding, metacognitive processing and text comprehension. Further analyses of both the entire sample and the SLI sample, indicated that there were significant correlations between character decoding, language processing, metacognitive processing with children’s text comprehension scores. In Study Two, there were 40 participants recruited from the SLI sample of the Study One. Cognitive reading strategy instruction program were developed. 21 participants was randomly selected to receive the experimental instruction and the another 19 were under conventional instruction as control. Besides the measures used in the Study One, interviews and teacher-reporting questionnaires were used to tap children’s belief towards reading and their classroom engagement. Analysis of pre-instruction and post-instruction tests indicated the experimental children showed significantly better progress on their oral language, text comprehension and belief about reading. Both the experimental and the control group showed similar progress on character decoding. The study offers both theoretical and educational contribution on the literacy development among the population of SLI. It identifies the role of metacognitive processing on literacy achievement. It provides the evidence of implementing cognitively-based reading strategies for literacy instruction for children with SLI within Chinese context. Upon the introduction of inclusive education, teachers now face students with much wider diversity, including a significant number of children with SLI. Possible collaboration between frontline teachers and speech therapists in designing potential classroom activities is discussed.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation
 
dc.description.thesisleveldoctoral
 
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Education
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4827362
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48273624
 
dc.subject.lcshSpecific language impairment in children - China - Hong Kong.
 
dc.subject.lcshReading (Primary) - China - Hong Kong.
 
dc.subject.lcshCognitive learning theory.
 
dc.titleCognitive reading strategies instruction for children with specific language impairment
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<item><contributor.author>Lau, Ka-ming.</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>&#21129;&#23478;&#26126;.</contributor.author>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<description.abstract>&#65279;The primarily goal of this study was to examine the patterns of cognitive and

language processing of children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and how

they related to their text comprehension, interpreted within constructivism. The study

aimed to characterize the difference in language, character decoding, metacognitive

processing and text comprehension between children with SLI and those under typical

development; to identify the inter-relationships among their language processing,

character decoding, metacognitive processing and text comprehension; and to

investigate how the implementation of cognitive reading strategies instruction change

their language processing, character decoding, metacognitive processing, belief

towards reading and text comprehension. Two studies were carried out.

In Study One, 73 participants were recruited from two Hong Kong primary

schools; they were at second and third grade, 42 were diagnosed of SLI and the other

were under typical development. Standardized instruments were used to tap children&#8217;s

language processing and character decoding respectively. Researcher developed

Metacognitive Processing Scale were adopted to rate their metacognitive and deep

processing of text. A set of comprehension test, comprised of forced-choice inferential

questions and two recall tasks, were used to assess their depth in understanding

different types of text. Analyses indicated that SLI students did not only score poorer

in language processing, but also in character decoding, metacognitive processing and

text comprehension. Further analyses of both the entire sample and the SLI sample,

indicated that there were significant correlations between character decoding,

language processing, metacognitive processing with children&#8217;s text comprehension

scores.

In Study Two, there were 40 participants recruited from the SLI sample of the

Study One. Cognitive reading strategy instruction program were developed. 21

participants was randomly selected to receive the experimental instruction and the

another 19 were under conventional instruction as control. Besides the measures used

in the Study One, interviews and teacher-reporting questionnaires were used to tap

children&#8217;s belief towards reading and their classroom engagement. Analysis of

pre-instruction and post-instruction tests indicated the experimental children showed

significantly better progress on their oral language, text comprehension and belief

about reading. Both the experimental and the control group showed similar progress

on character decoding.

The study offers both theoretical and educational contribution on the literacy

development among the population of SLI. It identifies the role of metacognitive

processing on literacy achievement. It provides the evidence of implementing

cognitively-based reading strategies for literacy instruction for children with SLI

within Chinese context. Upon the introduction of inclusive education, teachers now

face students with much wider diversity, including a significant number of children

with SLI. Possible collaboration between frontline teachers and speech therapists in

designing potential classroom activities is discussed.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>HKU Theses Online (HKUTO)</relation.ispartof>
<rights>The author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.</rights>
<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
<source.uri>http://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48273624</source.uri>
<subject.lcsh>Specific language impairment in children - China - Hong Kong.</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>Reading (Primary) - China - Hong Kong.</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>Cognitive learning theory.</subject.lcsh>
<title>Cognitive reading strategies instruction for children with specific language impairment</title>
<type>PG_Thesis</type>
<identifier.hkul>b4827362</identifier.hkul>
<description.thesisname>Doctor of Education</description.thesisname>
<description.thesislevel>doctoral</description.thesislevel>
<description.thesisdiscipline>Education</description.thesisdiscipline>
<description.nature>published_or_final_version</description.nature>
<date.hkucongregation>2012</date.hkucongregation>
<bitstream.url>http://hub.hku.hk/bitstream/10722/173863/1/FullText.pdf</bitstream.url>
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