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Postgraduate Thesis: Some associations between neighbourhood recreation facilities and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in Hong Kong
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TitleSome associations between neighbourhood recreation facilities and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsLee, Ka-yiu.
李嘉耀.
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractThe benefits of engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity have been documented in the literature. The neighbourhood environment, which could influence large proportions of population for sustained periods of time, has been associated with physical activity in Western countries. Yet, it remains unclear that how the neighbourhood environment in ultra-dense Hong Kong, especially with respect to proximity and availability of recreational facilities, is associated with physical activity of its residents. This study examines the associations between neighbourhood recreational facility, in both perceived and objective measures, and physical activity of residents in Hong Kong. The differences between perceived and objective availability of recreational facilities, and the perceived encouraging or discouraging features of a self-reported recreational facility were also examined. The availability of recreational facilities between high and low socio-economic status neighbourhoods was compared to identify inequalities of recreational resource allocation. A total of 480 participants aged 18-65 years, living in 32 neighbourhoods of different extremes of walkability and socio-economic status, were recruited to complete an interviewer-administered questionnaire in which the perceived aspects of neighbourhood recreational facilities were examined, and to wear a motion sensor which objectively measure physical activity for 7 consecutive days. Objective availability of 14 types of recreational facilities, categorized into combinations of indoor or outdoor and public, residential or commercial facilities, were quantified by direct observations. Geographical Information Systems further provided objective data regarding the number of parks, sports centres, sports grounds, playgrounds, swimming pools, bike lanes and pavilions available in the examined neighbourhoods. The objectively-assessed numbers of residential outdoor table tennis courts and public indoor swimming pools, and the presence of tennis courts, pavilions and swimming pools, as well as the perceived presence of bike lanes and swimming pools were positively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. In contrast, the objectively-assessed numbers of playgrounds, and the presence of soccer pitches, squash courts and playgrounds, were negatively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Poor agreements between perceived and objective availability of volleyball courts, soccer pitches, walking trails, weight and cardio-training equipment were observed. In contrast, good agreement between perceived and objective availability of tennis courts was observed. The level of agreement between perceived and objective availability of specific types of recreational facilities was influenced by the types of neighbourhood where participants lived and socio-demographics characteristics, such as age, education level and monthly household income. Perceived encouraging and discouraging features of a regularly-used recreational facility were observed across different domains, including the conditions of changing rooms and toilets, environmental safety, and aesthetics. High socio-economic status neighbourhoods had higher numbers of pavilions and swimming pools, and had higher odds of having sports grounds, swimming pools and tennis courts than low socio-economic status neighbourhoods. The findings of this study imply that certain types of recreational facilities have the potential to promote physical activity. Public health policy makers should enhance public awareness of neighbourhood recreational facilities, improve their quality and equality in distribution among high and low socio-economic status neighbourhoods, in an attempt to promote physical activity.
 
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
 
SubjectRecreation areas - China - Hong Kong.
Exercise - China - Hong Kong.
 
Dept/ProgramHuman Performance
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLee, Ka-yiu.
 
dc.contributor.author李嘉耀.
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2012
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThe benefits of engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity have been documented in the literature. The neighbourhood environment, which could influence large proportions of population for sustained periods of time, has been associated with physical activity in Western countries. Yet, it remains unclear that how the neighbourhood environment in ultra-dense Hong Kong, especially with respect to proximity and availability of recreational facilities, is associated with physical activity of its residents. This study examines the associations between neighbourhood recreational facility, in both perceived and objective measures, and physical activity of residents in Hong Kong. The differences between perceived and objective availability of recreational facilities, and the perceived encouraging or discouraging features of a self-reported recreational facility were also examined. The availability of recreational facilities between high and low socio-economic status neighbourhoods was compared to identify inequalities of recreational resource allocation. A total of 480 participants aged 18-65 years, living in 32 neighbourhoods of different extremes of walkability and socio-economic status, were recruited to complete an interviewer-administered questionnaire in which the perceived aspects of neighbourhood recreational facilities were examined, and to wear a motion sensor which objectively measure physical activity for 7 consecutive days. Objective availability of 14 types of recreational facilities, categorized into combinations of indoor or outdoor and public, residential or commercial facilities, were quantified by direct observations. Geographical Information Systems further provided objective data regarding the number of parks, sports centres, sports grounds, playgrounds, swimming pools, bike lanes and pavilions available in the examined neighbourhoods. The objectively-assessed numbers of residential outdoor table tennis courts and public indoor swimming pools, and the presence of tennis courts, pavilions and swimming pools, as well as the perceived presence of bike lanes and swimming pools were positively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. In contrast, the objectively-assessed numbers of playgrounds, and the presence of soccer pitches, squash courts and playgrounds, were negatively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Poor agreements between perceived and objective availability of volleyball courts, soccer pitches, walking trails, weight and cardio-training equipment were observed. In contrast, good agreement between perceived and objective availability of tennis courts was observed. The level of agreement between perceived and objective availability of specific types of recreational facilities was influenced by the types of neighbourhood where participants lived and socio-demographics characteristics, such as age, education level and monthly household income. Perceived encouraging and discouraging features of a regularly-used recreational facility were observed across different domains, including the conditions of changing rooms and toilets, environmental safety, and aesthetics. High socio-economic status neighbourhoods had higher numbers of pavilions and swimming pools, and had higher odds of having sports grounds, swimming pools and tennis courts than low socio-economic status neighbourhoods. The findings of this study imply that certain types of recreational facilities have the potential to promote physical activity. Public health policy makers should enhance public awareness of neighbourhood recreational facilities, improve their quality and equality in distribution among high and low socio-economic status neighbourhoods, in an attempt to promote physical activity.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineHuman Performance
 
dc.description.thesisleveldoctoral
 
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4833000
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48330000
 
dc.subject.lcshRecreation areas - China - Hong Kong.
 
dc.subject.lcshExercise - China - Hong Kong.
 
dc.titleSome associations between neighbourhood recreation facilities and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in Hong Kong
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<description.abstract>&#65279;The benefits of engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity have been documented in the literature. The neighbourhood environment, which could influence large proportions of population for sustained periods of time, has been associated with physical activity in Western countries. Yet, it remains unclear that how the neighbourhood environment in ultra-dense Hong Kong, especially with respect to proximity and availability of recreational facilities, is associated with physical activity of its residents.

This study examines the associations between neighbourhood recreational facility, in both perceived and objective measures, and physical activity of residents in Hong Kong. The differences between perceived and objective availability of recreational facilities, and the perceived encouraging or discouraging features of a self-reported recreational facility were also examined. The availability of recreational facilities between high and low socio-economic status neighbourhoods was compared to identify inequalities of recreational resource allocation.

A total of 480 participants aged 18-65 years, living in 32 neighbourhoods of different extremes of walkability and socio-economic status, were recruited to complete an interviewer-administered questionnaire in which the perceived aspects of neighbourhood recreational facilities were examined, and to wear a motion sensor which objectively measure physical activity for 7 consecutive days. Objective availability of 14 types of recreational facilities, categorized into combinations of indoor or outdoor and public, residential or commercial facilities, were quantified by direct observations. Geographical Information Systems further provided objective data regarding the number of parks, sports centres, sports grounds, playgrounds, swimming pools, bike lanes and pavilions available in the examined neighbourhoods. 

The objectively-assessed numbers of residential outdoor table tennis courts and public indoor swimming pools, and the presence of tennis courts, pavilions and swimming pools, as well as the perceived presence of bike lanes and swimming pools were positively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. In contrast, the objectively-assessed numbers of playgrounds, and the presence of soccer pitches, squash courts and playgrounds, were negatively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. 

Poor agreements between perceived and objective availability of volleyball courts, soccer pitches, walking trails, weight and cardio-training equipment were observed. In contrast, good agreement between perceived and objective availability of tennis courts was observed. The level of agreement between perceived and objective availability of specific types of recreational facilities was influenced by the types of neighbourhood where participants lived and socio-demographics characteristics, such as age, education level and monthly household income.

Perceived encouraging and discouraging features of a regularly-used recreational facility were observed across different domains, including the conditions of changing rooms and toilets, environmental safety, and aesthetics. 

High socio-economic status neighbourhoods had higher numbers of pavilions and swimming pools, and had higher odds of having sports grounds, swimming pools and tennis courts than low socio-economic status neighbourhoods. 

The findings of this study imply that certain types of recreational facilities have the potential to promote physical activity. Public health policy makers should enhance public awareness of neighbourhood recreational facilities, improve their quality and equality in distribution among high and low socio-economic status neighbourhoods, in an attempt to promote physical activity.</description.abstract>
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<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
<source.uri>http://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48330000</source.uri>
<subject.lcsh>Recreation areas - China - Hong Kong.</subject.lcsh>
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