File Download
Supplementary

undergraduate thesis: Coupling between the laryngeal and supralaryngeal systems

TitleCoupling between the laryngeal and supralaryngeal systems
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
AbstractThe present study investigated the coupling between the laryngeal and supralaryngeal systems in speech production. The interrelationship between the two systems was examined by studying the possible interaction between tone production (laryngeal system) and articulation (supralaryngeal system). Sixty (30 male and 30 female) native Cantonese speakers participated in the study. The first and second formant frequencies (F1 and F2) associated with the four vowels /i, u, ?, ?/ produced at six Cantonese lexical tones (highlevel, high-rising, mid-level, low-falling, low-rising and low-level tones) were obtained. Results revealed that, regardless of vowels, significant articulatory changes were found when produced at different tones. However, the difference pattern across each vowel was not systematic. Gender difference was also noted; male and female speakers showed different patterns in articulatory changes. These findings revealed the coupling effect between the laryngeal and supra-laryngeal systems.
Description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."
Includes bibliographical references (p. 27-30).
Thesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.
DegreeBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
SubjectSpeech -- Physiological aspects.
Dept/ProgramSpeech and Hearing Sciences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173718

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Wang-tingen_HK
dc.contributor.author李宏婷zh_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-01T01:14:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-01T01:14:07Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173718-
dc.description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 27-30).en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated the coupling between the laryngeal and supralaryngeal systems in speech production. The interrelationship between the two systems was examined by studying the possible interaction between tone production (laryngeal system) and articulation (supralaryngeal system). Sixty (30 male and 30 female) native Cantonese speakers participated in the study. The first and second formant frequencies (F1 and F2) associated with the four vowels /i, u, ?, ?/ produced at six Cantonese lexical tones (highlevel, high-rising, mid-level, low-falling, low-rising and low-level tones) were obtained. Results revealed that, regardless of vowels, significant articulatory changes were found when produced at different tones. However, the difference pattern across each vowel was not systematic. Gender difference was also noted; male and female speakers showed different patterns in articulatory changes. These findings revealed the coupling effect between the laryngeal and supra-laryngeal systems.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSpeech -- Physiological aspects.en_US
dc.titleCoupling between the laryngeal and supralaryngeal systemsen_HK
dc.typeUG_Thesisen_US
dc.identifier.hkulb4813166en_US
dc.description.thesisnameBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.thesislevelBacheloren_US
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats