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Undergraduate Thesis: Development of a verbal inhibitory control task for Cantonese speakers
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TitleDevelopment of a verbal inhibitory control task for Cantonese speakers
 
AuthorsKwok, San, Carole
郭珊
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractPrevious research has indicated normal English speaking controls were subject to proactive interference (PI) with manipulated semantic and phonological relatedness of distance between probes and list-items (Hamilton & Martin, 2007). We aimed at replicating results to Cantonese participants using negative probe test and to investigate if variation in writing and phonological system would inflict differential inhibitory processing. Relative to the English precedent, healthy participants showed concurrent ability to inhibit irrelevant information when probes are related to previous list. PI was significant on same list trials with semantically-related conditions, but not when they are phonologically-related. Such differential results provided important implications for language specificity where phonological processing units are shorter in Cantonese with mix of consonant-vowel-tone combinations than at individual phonemic level in English (Wong & Chen, 2009). Word frequency, regularity and use of visual strategies may also enhance recognition latency based on familiarity and level of activation during lexical processing.
 
Description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."
Includes bibliographical references.
Thesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.
 
DegreeBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
 
SubjectInhibition.
Verbal behavior -- Testing.
 
Dept/ProgramSpeech and Hearing Sciences
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorKwok, San, Carole
 
dc.contributor.author郭珊
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-01T01:14:03Z
 
dc.date.available2012-11-01T01:14:03Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has indicated normal English speaking controls were subject to proactive interference (PI) with manipulated semantic and phonological relatedness of distance between probes and list-items (Hamilton & Martin, 2007). We aimed at replicating results to Cantonese participants using negative probe test and to investigate if variation in writing and phonological system would inflict differential inhibitory processing. Relative to the English precedent, healthy participants showed concurrent ability to inhibit irrelevant information when probes are related to previous list. PI was significant on same list trials with semantically-related conditions, but not when they are phonologically-related. Such differential results provided important implications for language specificity where phonological processing units are shorter in Cantonese with mix of consonant-vowel-tone combinations than at individual phonemic level in English (Wong & Chen, 2009). Word frequency, regularity and use of visual strategies may also enhance recognition latency based on familiarity and level of activation during lexical processing.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."
 
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
 
dc.descriptionThesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciences
 
dc.description.thesislevelBachelor's
 
dc.description.thesisnameBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4813038
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173706
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.subject.lcshInhibition.
 
dc.subject.lcshVerbal behavior -- Testing.
 
dc.titleDevelopment of a verbal inhibitory control task for Cantonese speakers
 
dc.typeUG_Thesis
 
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<date.accessioned>2012-11-01T01:14:03Z</date.accessioned>
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<date.issued>2010</date.issued>
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<description>Includes bibliographical references.</description>
<description>Thesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.</description>
<description.abstract>Previous research has indicated normal English speaking controls were subject to proactive
interference (PI) with manipulated semantic and phonological relatedness of distance
between probes and list-items (Hamilton &amp; Martin, 2007). We aimed at replicating results to
Cantonese participants using negative probe test and to investigate if variation in writing and
phonological system would inflict differential inhibitory processing. Relative to the English
precedent, healthy participants showed concurrent ability to inhibit irrelevant information
when probes are related to previous list. PI was significant on same list trials with
semantically-related conditions, but not when they are phonologically-related. Such
differential results provided important implications for language specificity where
phonological processing units are shorter in Cantonese with mix of consonant-vowel-tone
combinations than at individual phonemic level in English (Wong &amp; Chen, 2009). Word
frequency, regularity and use of visual strategies may also enhance recognition latency based
on familiarity and level of activation during lexical processing.</description.abstract>
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<publisher>The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)</publisher>
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