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Article: Molecular analysis of circulating RNA in plasma.

TitleMolecular analysis of circulating RNA in plasma.
Authors
Issue Date2006
Citation
Methods In Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.), 2006, v. 336, p. 123-134 How to Cite?
AbstractCirculating RNA in plasma and serum is a newly developed area for molecular diagnosis. To date, increasing numbers of studies show that plasma and serum RNA could serve as both tumor- and fetal-specific markers for cancer detection and prenatal diagnosis, respectively. Recently, by introducing the highly sensitive one-step real-time quantitative reverse-transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), these potentially valuable RNA species, which often only exist at low concentrations in plasma and serum, can now be readily detected and quantified. Following the successful quantification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA in plasma of normal individuals, several placenta-derived mRNA species, including the mRNA transcripts of human placental lactogen (hPL), the beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (betahCG), and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) were also quantified in plasma of pregnant women. These circulating placental RNA species have provided the fetal-polymorphism-independent markers for prenatal diagnosis. The achievement in detecting the placental RNA in maternal plasma represents a significant step toward the development of RNA markers for noninvasive prenatal gene expression profiling. This detection technique can be extended to access a wide range of disease conditions, such as cancer and trauma. The one-step, real-time quantitative RT-PCR is a highly sensitive and specific, yet practically simple, RNA detection technique. This powerful technology may allow the practical employment of circulating RNA in the high-throughput clinical screening and monitoring applications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172925
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.549

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsui, NBen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, EKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, YMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:25:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:25:49Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationMethods In Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.), 2006, v. 336, p. 123-134en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-3745en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172925-
dc.description.abstractCirculating RNA in plasma and serum is a newly developed area for molecular diagnosis. To date, increasing numbers of studies show that plasma and serum RNA could serve as both tumor- and fetal-specific markers for cancer detection and prenatal diagnosis, respectively. Recently, by introducing the highly sensitive one-step real-time quantitative reverse-transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), these potentially valuable RNA species, which often only exist at low concentrations in plasma and serum, can now be readily detected and quantified. Following the successful quantification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA in plasma of normal individuals, several placenta-derived mRNA species, including the mRNA transcripts of human placental lactogen (hPL), the beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (betahCG), and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) were also quantified in plasma of pregnant women. These circulating placental RNA species have provided the fetal-polymorphism-independent markers for prenatal diagnosis. The achievement in detecting the placental RNA in maternal plasma represents a significant step toward the development of RNA markers for noninvasive prenatal gene expression profiling. This detection technique can be extended to access a wide range of disease conditions, such as cancer and trauma. The one-step, real-time quantitative RT-PCR is a highly sensitive and specific, yet practically simple, RNA detection technique. This powerful technology may allow the practical employment of circulating RNA in the high-throughput clinical screening and monitoring applications.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)en_US
dc.subject.meshChorionic Gonadotropin - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Primers - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Biology - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshPlacenta - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshPlacental Lactogen - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshRna - Analysis - Blood - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Messenger - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshSensitivity And Specificityen_US
dc.titleMolecular analysis of circulating RNA in plasma.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, EK: ngko@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNg, EK=rp01364en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid16916258-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749060044en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros172807-
dc.identifier.volume336en_US
dc.identifier.spage123en_US
dc.identifier.epage134en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsui, NB=6602401748en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, EK=21135553700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, YM=7401935391en_US

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