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Article: Value of clinical follow-up for local nasopharyngeal carcinoma relapse

TitleValue of clinical follow-up for local nasopharyngeal carcinoma relapse
Authors
Issue Date1992
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38137
Citation
Head And Neck, 1992, v. 14 n. 3, p. 208-217 How to Cite?
AbstractThree hundred seventy-nine new patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were followed clinically and the physical examination, including that of the nasopharynx by indirect mirror for symptoms after treatment. At the time of analysis, with a median follow-up of 34.8 months, 47 patients had developed recurrent disease in the nasopharynx and in the immediately adjacent regions. In 31 patients the first clinical features to suggest local recurrence were progressive symptoms (group A). In another 13 patients recurrence of tumor in the nasopharynx was detected by indirect mirror examination (group B). In the remaining three patients, the diagnosis was made during investigation for neck node recurrence. The more common symptoms at diagnosis of local recurrence were headache; cranial nerve palsy involving the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth nerves; and ear and nasal symptoms. Group B patients tended to have less of these symptoms. The presence of tumor was confirmed by fiberscopic examination and biopsy in all group B patients and 14 of 31 group A patients, the tumor was submucosal in the remaining 17 group A patients. The recurrence in group B patients was diagnosed significantly earlier than the group A patients (p = 0.0294), and group A patients suffered from more invasive and extensive disease in comparison with group B patients (p = 0.0044). There were significantly less patients in group A who were amenable to curative brachytherapy (p = 0.0280). Clinical follow-up for local NPC recurrence was found to be useful. More frequent use of fiberscopic examination in the follow-up, especially for those not adequately examined by indirect mirror examination, will improve the detection rate. Cross-sectional imaging techniques and the monitoring of tumor markers may supplement clinical and fiberscopic examinations. An algorithm for diagnosing recurrent NPC and possible treatment are suggested.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172675
ISSN
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSham, JSTen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoy, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_US
dc.contributor.authorYau, CCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:24:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:24:11Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationHead And Neck, 1992, v. 14 n. 3, p. 208-217en_US
dc.identifier.issn0148-6403en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172675-
dc.description.abstractThree hundred seventy-nine new patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were followed clinically and the physical examination, including that of the nasopharynx by indirect mirror for symptoms after treatment. At the time of analysis, with a median follow-up of 34.8 months, 47 patients had developed recurrent disease in the nasopharynx and in the immediately adjacent regions. In 31 patients the first clinical features to suggest local recurrence were progressive symptoms (group A). In another 13 patients recurrence of tumor in the nasopharynx was detected by indirect mirror examination (group B). In the remaining three patients, the diagnosis was made during investigation for neck node recurrence. The more common symptoms at diagnosis of local recurrence were headache; cranial nerve palsy involving the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth nerves; and ear and nasal symptoms. Group B patients tended to have less of these symptoms. The presence of tumor was confirmed by fiberscopic examination and biopsy in all group B patients and 14 of 31 group A patients, the tumor was submucosal in the remaining 17 group A patients. The recurrence in group B patients was diagnosed significantly earlier than the group A patients (p = 0.0294), and group A patients suffered from more invasive and extensive disease in comparison with group B patients (p = 0.0044). There were significantly less patients in group A who were amenable to curative brachytherapy (p = 0.0280). Clinical follow-up for local NPC recurrence was found to be useful. More frequent use of fiberscopic examination in the follow-up, especially for those not adequately examined by indirect mirror examination, will improve the detection rate. Cross-sectional imaging techniques and the monitoring of tumor markers may supplement clinical and fiberscopic examinations. An algorithm for diagnosing recurrent NPC and possible treatment are suggested.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38137en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHead and Necken_US
dc.subject.meshAlgorithmsen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - Diagnosis - Pathology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Recurrence, Local - Diagnosis - Pathology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Examinationen_US
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computeden_US
dc.titleValue of clinical follow-up for local nasopharyngeal carcinoma relapseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hed.2880140308-
dc.identifier.pmid1587738-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026773394en_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage208en_US
dc.identifier.epage217en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992HQ09800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, JST=7101655565en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoy, D=7102939127en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, CC=7007038422en_US

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