File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Testing the global city-social polarisation thesis: Hong Kong since the 1990s

TitleTesting the global city-social polarisation thesis: Hong Kong since the 1990s
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/
Citation
Urban Studies, 2004, v. 41 n. 10, p. 1863-1888 How to Cite?
AbstractThe literature on the development of global cities suggests that Hong Kong had qualified as a global city by the early 1990s. Using data from the Population Censuses, this paper documents the extent to which the process of social polarisation accompanied Hong Kong's globalisation. As predicted by the global city literature, Hong Kong experienced during the 1990s a process of occupational polarisation and widening income inequality as a result of its transformation from an industrial colony to a producer service-driven global city. The paper outlines the gender dimension in this polarisation process, and how the forces of migration contributed to the reshaping of the social structure so that it now resembles an 'hour-glass'. The findings largely support Sassen's hypotheses regarding the social consequences of global city development, but the paper also highlights the effect of local institutional contexts in mediating the impact of global forces. © 2004 The Editors of Urban Studies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172351
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.934
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.567
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, SWKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLui, TLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:56Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationUrban Studies, 2004, v. 41 n. 10, p. 1863-1888en_US
dc.identifier.issn0042-0980en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172351-
dc.description.abstractThe literature on the development of global cities suggests that Hong Kong had qualified as a global city by the early 1990s. Using data from the Population Censuses, this paper documents the extent to which the process of social polarisation accompanied Hong Kong's globalisation. As predicted by the global city literature, Hong Kong experienced during the 1990s a process of occupational polarisation and widening income inequality as a result of its transformation from an industrial colony to a producer service-driven global city. The paper outlines the gender dimension in this polarisation process, and how the forces of migration contributed to the reshaping of the social structure so that it now resembles an 'hour-glass'. The findings largely support Sassen's hypotheses regarding the social consequences of global city development, but the paper also highlights the effect of local institutional contexts in mediating the impact of global forces. © 2004 The Editors of Urban Studies.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Studiesen_US
dc.titleTesting the global city-social polarisation thesis: Hong Kong since the 1990sen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLui, TL: tloklui@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLui, TL=rp00868en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0042098042000256297en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-5644270184en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-5644270184&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume41en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1863en_US
dc.identifier.epage1888en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000223936900001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, SWK=7202291604en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLui, TL=35844286800en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats