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Article: Crime, juvenile delinquency and deterrence policy in China

TitleCrime, juvenile delinquency and deterrence policy in China
Authors
Issue Date1993
Citation
Australian Journal Of Chinese Affairs, 1993, v. 30, p. 29-58 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the 1980s China began to witness a substantial increase in criminal activity - mainly as a consequence of rapidly growing juvenile delinquency. Chinese deterrence policy vastly over-reacted to this perceived threat to social order, in an effort to demonstrate the government's defense of moral and cultural values at a time of dramatic economic and social change. International comparison has highlighted the remarkably low rates of crime in Chinese society. The tough reaction there to all forms of crime cannot be rationally explained on the basis of these low rates. The many executions have served only to brutalize the crime scene. The state seems oblivious to the fact that the government's own violence - both in the streets and on the execution ground - might be responsible for propagating further violence. To appreciate the seemingly irrational policies pursued in China over the last decade, it is necessary to view deterrence and execution as social and cultural spectacles, not as types of crime control or punishment only. -from Author
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172326
ISSN
1997 Impact Factor: 0.2

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBakken, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:49Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationAustralian Journal Of Chinese Affairs, 1993, v. 30, p. 29-58en_US
dc.identifier.issn0156-7365en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172326-
dc.description.abstractIn the 1980s China began to witness a substantial increase in criminal activity - mainly as a consequence of rapidly growing juvenile delinquency. Chinese deterrence policy vastly over-reacted to this perceived threat to social order, in an effort to demonstrate the government's defense of moral and cultural values at a time of dramatic economic and social change. International comparison has highlighted the remarkably low rates of crime in Chinese society. The tough reaction there to all forms of crime cannot be rationally explained on the basis of these low rates. The many executions have served only to brutalize the crime scene. The state seems oblivious to the fact that the government's own violence - both in the streets and on the execution ground - might be responsible for propagating further violence. To appreciate the seemingly irrational policies pursued in China over the last decade, it is necessary to view deterrence and execution as social and cultural spectacles, not as types of crime control or punishment only. -from Authoren_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian Journal of Chinese Affairsen_US
dc.titleCrime, juvenile delinquency and deterrence policy in Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBakken, B: bakken@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBakken, B=rp00616en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027865003en_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.spage29en_US
dc.identifier.epage58en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBakken, B=6603543706en_US

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