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Article: A longitudinal study of cortisol responses, sleep problems, and psychological well-being as the predictors of changes in depressive symptoms among breast cancer survivors

TitleA longitudinal study of cortisol responses, sleep problems, and psychological well-being as the predictors of changes in depressive symptoms among breast cancer survivors
Authors
KeywordsAttachment Styles
Cortisol Responses
Depression
Meaning In Life
Psychological Well-Being
Sleep Problems
Issue Date2013
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psyneuen
Citation
Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2013, v. 38 n. 3, p. 356-366 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: This study examined whether the changes in sleep problems, attachment styles, meaning in life, and salivary cortisol over the course of 14 months were the predictors of changes in depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer at post-treatment stage. Methods: The study included 76 participants who completed active breast cancer treatment with longitudinal data collected at five points, including baseline assessment (T0) and the four follow-ups after baseline: T1 (in the 2nd month), T2 (in the 5th month), T3 (in the 8th month), and T4 (in the 14th month). The self-reported questionnaires included the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep (MOS-Sleep) scale; the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II); the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) scale for measuring anxiety and avoidance dimensions of attachment style; and the Meaning in Life Questionnaire (MLQ), consisting of the MLQ-Presence scale and the MLQ-Search scale. The participants collected their salivary cortisol at home at six time points: upon waking, 30 and 45 min after waking, and at 1200 h, 1700 h, and 2100 h. Results: Higher scores on for anxiety-related attachment style and the sleep problems index at baseline were associated with more severe initial depressive symptoms after the age, BMI, cancer, and treatment variables were controlled. The presence of meaning in life at baseline was negatively correlated with initial depressive symptoms. Moreover, the decreases in the presence of meaning in life over the course of 14 months predicted more severe depressive symptoms. In addition, the persistent increases of cortisol level at 2100 h across 14-month follow-ups predicted worsening depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Lacking presence of meaning in life as a predictor for severe depressive symptoms demonstrates that breast cancer survivors who lack psychological well-being are more likely to be depressed. The persistent elevation of cortisol levels at night also indicates breast cancer survivors to be at high risk of depression. © 2012.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172312
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.704
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.740
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, FHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, KJen_US
dc.contributor.authorKuo, WHen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, YFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, YMen_US
dc.contributor.authorJow, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:21Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychoneuroendocrinology, 2013, v. 38 n. 3, p. 356-366en_US
dc.identifier.issn0306-4530en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172312-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study examined whether the changes in sleep problems, attachment styles, meaning in life, and salivary cortisol over the course of 14 months were the predictors of changes in depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer at post-treatment stage. Methods: The study included 76 participants who completed active breast cancer treatment with longitudinal data collected at five points, including baseline assessment (T0) and the four follow-ups after baseline: T1 (in the 2nd month), T2 (in the 5th month), T3 (in the 8th month), and T4 (in the 14th month). The self-reported questionnaires included the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep (MOS-Sleep) scale; the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II); the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) scale for measuring anxiety and avoidance dimensions of attachment style; and the Meaning in Life Questionnaire (MLQ), consisting of the MLQ-Presence scale and the MLQ-Search scale. The participants collected their salivary cortisol at home at six time points: upon waking, 30 and 45 min after waking, and at 1200 h, 1700 h, and 2100 h. Results: Higher scores on for anxiety-related attachment style and the sleep problems index at baseline were associated with more severe initial depressive symptoms after the age, BMI, cancer, and treatment variables were controlled. The presence of meaning in life at baseline was negatively correlated with initial depressive symptoms. Moreover, the decreases in the presence of meaning in life over the course of 14 months predicted more severe depressive symptoms. In addition, the persistent increases of cortisol level at 2100 h across 14-month follow-ups predicted worsening depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Lacking presence of meaning in life as a predictor for severe depressive symptoms demonstrates that breast cancer survivors who lack psychological well-being are more likely to be depressed. The persistent elevation of cortisol levels at night also indicates breast cancer survivors to be at high risk of depression. © 2012.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psyneuenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychoneuroendocrinologyen_US
dc.subjectAttachment Stylesen_US
dc.subjectCortisol Responsesen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectMeaning In Lifeen_US
dc.subjectPsychological Well-Beingen_US
dc.subjectSleep Problemsen_US
dc.titleA longitudinal study of cortisol responses, sleep problems, and psychological well-being as the predictors of changes in depressive symptoms among breast cancer survivorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_US
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psyneuen.2012.06.010en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22818228-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84875232539en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000316775400006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiao, FH=7006744649en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, KJ=36071657200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKuo, WH=9632733700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, CS=34768385900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, YF=24830728400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, YM=7401512146en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJow, GM=6603159405en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, RTH=8620896500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, SM=7403358478en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10955806-

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