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Article: Suicide in Asia: opportunities and challenges

TitleSuicide in Asia: opportunities and challenges
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://epirev.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Epidemiologic Reviews, 2012, v. 34 n. 1, p. 129-144 How to Cite?
AbstractAsian countries account for approximately 60% of the world's suicides, but there is a great mismatch in the region between the scale of the problem and the resources available to tackle it. Despite certain commonalities, the continent itself is culturally, economically, and socially diverse. This paper reviews current epidemiologic patterns of suicide, including suicide trends, sociodemographic factors, urban/rural living, suicide methods, sociocultural religious influences, and risk and protective factors in Asia, as well as their implications. The observed epidemiologic distributions of suicides reflect complex interplays among the traditional value/culture system, rapid economic transitions under market globalization, availability/desirability of suicide methods, and sociocultural permission/prohibitions regarding suicides. In general, compared with Western countries, Asian countries still have a higher average suicide rate, lower male-to-female suicide gender ratio, and higher elderly-to-general-population suicide ratios. The role of mental illness in suicide is not as important as that in Western countries. In contrast, aggravated by access to lethal means in Asia (e.g., pesticide poisoning and jumping), acute life stress (e.g., family conflicts, job and financial security issues) plays a more important role than it does in Western countries. Some promising suicide prevention programs in Asia are illustrated. Considering the specific socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the region, community-based suicide intervention programs integrating multiple layers of intervention targets may be the most feasible and cost-effective strategy in Asia, with its populous areas and limited resources. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172309
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.333
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.917
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, YYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, KCCen_US
dc.contributor.authorYousuf, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiologic Reviews, 2012, v. 34 n. 1, p. 129-144en_US
dc.identifier.issn0193-936Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172309-
dc.description.abstractAsian countries account for approximately 60% of the world's suicides, but there is a great mismatch in the region between the scale of the problem and the resources available to tackle it. Despite certain commonalities, the continent itself is culturally, economically, and socially diverse. This paper reviews current epidemiologic patterns of suicide, including suicide trends, sociodemographic factors, urban/rural living, suicide methods, sociocultural religious influences, and risk and protective factors in Asia, as well as their implications. The observed epidemiologic distributions of suicides reflect complex interplays among the traditional value/culture system, rapid economic transitions under market globalization, availability/desirability of suicide methods, and sociocultural permission/prohibitions regarding suicides. In general, compared with Western countries, Asian countries still have a higher average suicide rate, lower male-to-female suicide gender ratio, and higher elderly-to-general-population suicide ratios. The role of mental illness in suicide is not as important as that in Western countries. In contrast, aggravated by access to lethal means in Asia (e.g., pesticide poisoning and jumping), acute life stress (e.g., family conflicts, job and financial security issues) plays a more important role than it does in Western countries. Some promising suicide prevention programs in Asia are illustrated. Considering the specific socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the region, community-based suicide intervention programs integrating multiple layers of intervention targets may be the most feasible and cost-effective strategy in Asia, with its populous areas and limited resources. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://epirev.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologic Reviewsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAsia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshSuicide - Prevention & Control - Trendsen_US
dc.titleSuicide in Asia: opportunities and challengesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/epirev/mxr025en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22158651-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862907899en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros211092-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862907899&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage129en_US
dc.identifier.epage144en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1478-6729-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298890100012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, YY=52163268600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChienChang Wu, K=55265703200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYousuf, S=54886462700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_US

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