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Article: Gender differences in mental health literacy among Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne, Australia

TitleGender differences in mental health literacy among Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne, Australia
Authors
KeywordsChinese-Speaking Australians
Cultural Beliefs
Depression
Knowledge Of Mental Health Services
Mental Health Literacy
Schizophrenia
Issue Date2012
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105597
Citation
International Journal Of Social Psychiatry, 2012, v. 58 n. 2, p. 178-185 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: This study attempted to understand gender differences in knowledge of mental illness, preference for professional help, and medications and treatment methods among Australians of Chinese-speaking background.Methods: This study adopted a cluster convenience sampling method in which subjects were taken from the four major areas in cosmopolitan Melbourne where most Chinese people are living. A total of 200 Chinese-speaking Australians participated in the study. They were presented with two vignettes describing an individual with acute depression or acute schizophrenia and then questions were asked to assess their understanding of the conditions, preference for professional help, medications and treatment methods.Results: More female than male respondents could correctly identify the conditions in the two vignettes. Female participants also perceived medications to be relatively more harmful than their male counterparts. In contrast, there were significantly more males than females who adhered to traditional views on the causation of mental illness; had significantly higher percentages of endorsement of 'deal with it alone'; believed 'traditional Chinese medical doctor' and 'Chinese herbal medicines' to be helpful to the person in the schizophrenia vignette; and significantly endorsed 'psychiatric ward', 'electro-convulsive treatment', 'changing fungshui' and 'traditional Chinese worship' to be helpful for the persons in both vignettes. A combination of factors, which included age, duration of migration and traditional Chinese cultural values, were put forward to explain the above differences.Conclusions: Campaigns to improve the mental health literacy of Chinese-speaking Australians must take into account the gender differences between male and female Chinese-speaking Australians so that culturally relevant and gender-specific education programmes can be developed. © SAGE Publications 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172288
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, AYKen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, AYMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Social Psychiatry, 2012, v. 58 n. 2, p. 178-185en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7640en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172288-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study attempted to understand gender differences in knowledge of mental illness, preference for professional help, and medications and treatment methods among Australians of Chinese-speaking background.Methods: This study adopted a cluster convenience sampling method in which subjects were taken from the four major areas in cosmopolitan Melbourne where most Chinese people are living. A total of 200 Chinese-speaking Australians participated in the study. They were presented with two vignettes describing an individual with acute depression or acute schizophrenia and then questions were asked to assess their understanding of the conditions, preference for professional help, medications and treatment methods.Results: More female than male respondents could correctly identify the conditions in the two vignettes. Female participants also perceived medications to be relatively more harmful than their male counterparts. In contrast, there were significantly more males than females who adhered to traditional views on the causation of mental illness; had significantly higher percentages of endorsement of 'deal with it alone'; believed 'traditional Chinese medical doctor' and 'Chinese herbal medicines' to be helpful to the person in the schizophrenia vignette; and significantly endorsed 'psychiatric ward', 'electro-convulsive treatment', 'changing fungshui' and 'traditional Chinese worship' to be helpful for the persons in both vignettes. A combination of factors, which included age, duration of migration and traditional Chinese cultural values, were put forward to explain the above differences.Conclusions: Campaigns to improve the mental health literacy of Chinese-speaking Australians must take into account the gender differences between male and female Chinese-speaking Australians so that culturally relevant and gender-specific education programmes can be developed. © SAGE Publications 2010.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105597en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Social Psychiatryen_US
dc.subjectChinese-Speaking Australiansen_US
dc.subjectCultural Beliefsen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectKnowledge Of Mental Health Servicesen_US
dc.subjectMental Health Literacyen_US
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_US
dc.titleGender differences in mental health literacy among Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne, Australiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChow, AYM: chowamy@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChow, AYM=rp00623en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0020764010390431en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21307086-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857535108en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros220807-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857535108&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume58en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage178en_US
dc.identifier.epage185en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300556700009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, AYK=42561610400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, A=33068355500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, AYM=35733472800en_US

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