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Article: The maintenance effect of cognitive-behavioural treatment groups for the Chinese parents of children with intellectual disabilities in Melbourne, Australia: A 6-month follow-up study

TitleThe maintenance effect of cognitive-behavioural treatment groups for the Chinese parents of children with intellectual disabilities in Melbourne, Australia: A 6-month follow-up study
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0964-2633
Citation
Journal Of Intellectual Disability Research, 2011, v. 55 n. 11, p. 1043-1053 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Caring for a child with intellectual disability can be stressful. No data on the longer-term effects of cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) on parents from a Chinese-speaking background who have children with intellectual disabilities are available in the literature. This study attempted to fill this research gap by examining the maintenance effect of CBT among the Chinese parents of such children in Melbourne, Australia. Method Thirty-nine participants took part in our CBT groups and attended follow-up meetings. A questionnaire comprising four instruments, the Parenting Stress Index (PS) - Parent Domain, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), Abbreviated Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q-18) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS), was administered to the participants at the pre- and post-test stage and at the 6-month follow-up. Results One-way repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed significant time and group effects in the PS (F 2,27=16.93, P<0.001), Q-LES-Q-18 (F 2,27=15.98, P<0.001), GHQ-12 (F 2,27=81.93, P<0.001) and DAS (F 2,27=15.50, P<0.001) scores at the three measurement times. The participants continued to maintain significant improvements in mental health and quality of life and declines in the severity of parenting stress and dysfunctional attitudes at the 6-month follow-up. Effect size analyses revealed mostly large differences in the foregoing measurements (Cohen's d=0.76-2.18) between the pre-test and 6-month follow-up. Employing a cut-off score of 3/4 in the GHQ-12 to identify at-risk and not-at-risk cases, approximately 90.5% of the participants could be classified as not-at-risk at the follow-up. Lastly, regression analyses showed that changes in DAS scores significantly predicted changes in the GHQ-12 and Q-LES-Q-18 scores at the follow-up. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence of the 6-month maintenance effect of CBT groups for the Melbourne-resident Chinese parents of children with intellectual disabilities. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172269
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.07
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.088
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwok, YCLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Intellectual Disability Research, 2011, v. 55 n. 11, p. 1043-1053en_US
dc.identifier.issn0964-2633en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172269-
dc.description.abstractBackground Caring for a child with intellectual disability can be stressful. No data on the longer-term effects of cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) on parents from a Chinese-speaking background who have children with intellectual disabilities are available in the literature. This study attempted to fill this research gap by examining the maintenance effect of CBT among the Chinese parents of such children in Melbourne, Australia. Method Thirty-nine participants took part in our CBT groups and attended follow-up meetings. A questionnaire comprising four instruments, the Parenting Stress Index (PS) - Parent Domain, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), Abbreviated Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q-18) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS), was administered to the participants at the pre- and post-test stage and at the 6-month follow-up. Results One-way repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed significant time and group effects in the PS (F 2,27=16.93, P<0.001), Q-LES-Q-18 (F 2,27=15.98, P<0.001), GHQ-12 (F 2,27=81.93, P<0.001) and DAS (F 2,27=15.50, P<0.001) scores at the three measurement times. The participants continued to maintain significant improvements in mental health and quality of life and declines in the severity of parenting stress and dysfunctional attitudes at the 6-month follow-up. Effect size analyses revealed mostly large differences in the foregoing measurements (Cohen's d=0.76-2.18) between the pre-test and 6-month follow-up. Employing a cut-off score of 3/4 in the GHQ-12 to identify at-risk and not-at-risk cases, approximately 90.5% of the participants could be classified as not-at-risk at the follow-up. Lastly, regression analyses showed that changes in DAS scores significantly predicted changes in the GHQ-12 and Q-LES-Q-18 scores at the follow-up. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence of the 6-month maintenance effect of CBT groups for the Melbourne-resident Chinese parents of children with intellectual disabilities. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0964-2633en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Intellectual Disability Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshAustralia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCognitive Therapy - Methods - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshEvidence-Based Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshFamily Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIntellectual Disability - Ethnology - Psychology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshParents - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshQuality Of Lifeen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - Ethnology - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleThe maintenance effect of cognitive-behavioural treatment groups for the Chinese parents of children with intellectual disabilities in Melbourne, Australia: A 6-month follow-up studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2788.2011.01431.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid21668803-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80054933588en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros256235-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80054933588&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume55en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage1043en_US
dc.identifier.epage1053en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, A=33068355500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, YCL=54389347700en_US

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