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Article: Psychological factors associated with the incidence and persistence of suicidal ideation
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TitlePsychological factors associated with the incidence and persistence of suicidal ideation
 
AuthorsZhang, Y1
Law, CK2
Yip, PSF1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
 
CitationJournal of affective disorders, 2011, v. 133 n. 3, p. 584-590 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2011.05.003
 
AbstractBACKGROUND: Suicidal ideation has been identified as both a common antecedent and a significant risk factor for suicide attempt and completed suicide. However, little is known about the incidence and persistence of suicidal ideation in the general population and the associated risk factors. METHODS: A 12-month follow-up survey investigated 997 of the respondents who participated in the baseline territory-wide survey of adult population in Hong Kong. A set of baseline psychological factors was considered as predictors of first onset and persistence of suicidal ideation. RESULTS: Twelve-month incidence (1.9%) and persistence (6.2%) rates were estimated. Respondents with anxiety and lack of reasons for living were more likely to report a development of suicidal thoughts in the follow-up assessment, while respondents with higher level of average life distress and lower level of hope were at increased risk of continuing to have suicidal thoughts. Depression was found to partially mediate the effect of average life distress on persistent suicidality. LIMITATIONS: Retention rate of the follow-up sample was about 50% only. Assessments of suicidal ideation were based on retrospective reports. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological factors differentially predict first onset and persistence of suicidal ideation. It is of clinical value that depression partially mediated the effect of life distress on persistence of suicidality.
 
ISSN0165-0327
2013 Impact Factor: 3.705
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.847
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2011.05.003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CK
 
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:03Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:03Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Suicidal ideation has been identified as both a common antecedent and a significant risk factor for suicide attempt and completed suicide. However, little is known about the incidence and persistence of suicidal ideation in the general population and the associated risk factors. METHODS: A 12-month follow-up survey investigated 997 of the respondents who participated in the baseline territory-wide survey of adult population in Hong Kong. A set of baseline psychological factors was considered as predictors of first onset and persistence of suicidal ideation. RESULTS: Twelve-month incidence (1.9%) and persistence (6.2%) rates were estimated. Respondents with anxiety and lack of reasons for living were more likely to report a development of suicidal thoughts in the follow-up assessment, while respondents with higher level of average life distress and lower level of hope were at increased risk of continuing to have suicidal thoughts. Depression was found to partially mediate the effect of average life distress on persistent suicidality. LIMITATIONS: Retention rate of the follow-up sample was about 50% only. Assessments of suicidal ideation were based on retrospective reports. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological factors differentially predict first onset and persistence of suicidal ideation. It is of clinical value that depression partially mediated the effect of life distress on persistence of suicidality.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal of affective disorders, 2011, v. 133 n. 3, p. 584-590 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2011.05.003
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2011.05.003
 
dc.identifier.epage590
 
dc.identifier.hkuros211185
 
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327
2013 Impact Factor: 3.705
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.847
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid21636133
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052095663
 
dc.identifier.spage584
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172265
 
dc.identifier.volume133
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of affective disorders
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAnxiety
 
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological
 
dc.subject.meshSuicidal Ideation
 
dc.subject.meshSuicide - psychology - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.titlePsychological factors associated with the incidence and persistence of suicidal ideation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Chinese University of Hong Kong