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Article: Employment status and suicide: The complex relationships between changing unemployment rates and death rates

TitleEmployment status and suicide: The complex relationships between changing unemployment rates and death rates
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2011, v. 65 n. 8, p. 733-736 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Existing studies have described a strong correlation between unemployment rates and suicide rates, but the exact mechanisms through which they may interact with one another remain unknown. Method This study examined the complex relationships between suicide rates and both regional unemployment rates and individual employment status during times of economic recession (2000-3) and recovery (2003-6) in Hong Kong. Results: Despite the strong correlation (0.86) between the unemployment rates and suicide rates for 2000-6, the rates of suicides within the employed and unemployed groups moved in the opposite direction from the overall population trend. That is, the suicide rate among the unemployed decreased during economic recession and increased during recovery. Conclusion: It is important to be able to distinguish precisely between population-level concepts, such as rates, and individual-level characteristics, such as employment status, when considering the development of evidence-based suicide prevention strategies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172257
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_US
dc.contributor.authorCaine, EDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2011, v. 65 n. 8, p. 733-736en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172257-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Existing studies have described a strong correlation between unemployment rates and suicide rates, but the exact mechanisms through which they may interact with one another remain unknown. Method This study examined the complex relationships between suicide rates and both regional unemployment rates and individual employment status during times of economic recession (2000-3) and recovery (2003-6) in Hong Kong. Results: Despite the strong correlation (0.86) between the unemployment rates and suicide rates for 2000-6, the rates of suicides within the employed and unemployed groups moved in the opposite direction from the overall population trend. That is, the suicide rate among the unemployed decreased during economic recession and increased during recovery. Conclusion: It is important to be able to distinguish precisely between population-level concepts, such as rates, and individual-level characteristics, such as employment status, when considering the development of evidence-based suicide prevention strategies.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshEconomic Recessionen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMortality - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshSuicideen_US
dc.subject.meshUnemployment - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleEmployment status and suicide: The complex relationships between changing unemployment rates and death ratesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2010.110726en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21115474-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960206342en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros211191-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960206342&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume65en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage733en_US
dc.identifier.epage736en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1470-2738-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292318000017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCaine, ED=7004971707en_US

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