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Article: Knowledge and preferences regarding schizophrenia among Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne, Australia.

TitleKnowledge and preferences regarding schizophrenia among Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne, Australia.
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Social Psychiatry And Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2010, v. 45 n. 9, p. 865-873 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to better understand the knowledge of schizophrenia, preferences regarding professional help, medication and treatment methods among Australians of a Chinese-speaking background. METHODS: A cluster convenience sampling method was adopted in which subjects were taken from the four main areas in cosmopolitan Melbourne where most Chinese people live. A total of 200 Chinese-speaking Australians participated in the study. They were presented with a vignette describing an individual with schizophrenia and were then asked questions to assess their understanding of schizophrenia and their preferences regarding professional help, medication and treatment methods. A comparative approach was used to compare our findings with those of a previous study on the mental health literacy of Australian and Japanese adults. RESULTS: Compared with the Australian and Japanese samples, a much lower percentage of Chinese-speaking Australians (15.5%) was able to identify the vignette as a case of schizophrenia/psychosis. A higher percentage of the Chinese-speaking Australians believed that professionals, and particularly counselling professionals, could be helpful for the person in the vignette. A higher percentage of the Chinese-speaking Australian and Japanese samples believed that close family members could be helpful, and expressed more uncertainty about the usefulness or harmfulness of certain medications than the Australian sample. A higher percentage of the Chinese-speaking Australians than the Australian and Japanese samples endorsed inpatient treatment for the person in the vignette. About 22, 17, 19 and 28% of the Chinese-speaking Australian participants, respectively, rated 'traditional Chinese medical doctors', 'Chinese herbal medications', 'taking Chinese nutritional foods/supplements' and 'qiqong' as helpful. Many perceived 'changing fungshui' and 'traditional Chinese prayer' to be harmful. CONCLUSIONS: Campaigns to increase the schizophrenia literacy of Chinese-speaking Australians are needed and must take into consideration the aforementioned socially and culturally driven beliefs so that culturally relevant education programmes can be developed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172243
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.095
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, FKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, YKen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:53Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationSocial Psychiatry And Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2010, v. 45 n. 9, p. 865-873en_US
dc.identifier.issn1433-9285en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172243-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to better understand the knowledge of schizophrenia, preferences regarding professional help, medication and treatment methods among Australians of a Chinese-speaking background. METHODS: A cluster convenience sampling method was adopted in which subjects were taken from the four main areas in cosmopolitan Melbourne where most Chinese people live. A total of 200 Chinese-speaking Australians participated in the study. They were presented with a vignette describing an individual with schizophrenia and were then asked questions to assess their understanding of schizophrenia and their preferences regarding professional help, medication and treatment methods. A comparative approach was used to compare our findings with those of a previous study on the mental health literacy of Australian and Japanese adults. RESULTS: Compared with the Australian and Japanese samples, a much lower percentage of Chinese-speaking Australians (15.5%) was able to identify the vignette as a case of schizophrenia/psychosis. A higher percentage of the Chinese-speaking Australians believed that professionals, and particularly counselling professionals, could be helpful for the person in the vignette. A higher percentage of the Chinese-speaking Australian and Japanese samples believed that close family members could be helpful, and expressed more uncertainty about the usefulness or harmfulness of certain medications than the Australian sample. A higher percentage of the Chinese-speaking Australians than the Australian and Japanese samples endorsed inpatient treatment for the person in the vignette. About 22, 17, 19 and 28% of the Chinese-speaking Australian participants, respectively, rated 'traditional Chinese medical doctors', 'Chinese herbal medications', 'taking Chinese nutritional foods/supplements' and 'qiqong' as helpful. Many perceived 'changing fungshui' and 'traditional Chinese prayer' to be harmful. CONCLUSIONS: Campaigns to increase the schizophrenia literacy of Chinese-speaking Australians are needed and must take into consideration the aforementioned socially and culturally driven beliefs so that culturally relevant education programmes can be developed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAntipsychotic Agents - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshAustralia - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCultureen_US
dc.subject.meshData Collection - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Educationen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Literacy - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMedicine, Chinese Traditional - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPsychotherapy - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Diagnosis - Ethnology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshUrban Population - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.titleKnowledge and preferences regarding schizophrenia among Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne, Australia.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, FK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, FK=rp00593en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-009-0122-5en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19696955-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77958122554en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros256240-
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage865en_US
dc.identifier.epage873en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000280846500003-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, FK=35231716600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, YK=33068137400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, A=33068355500en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5632614-

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